Media Scan

Mediascan: Nutrition Blog, a Marathoner's Tale, Alternatives to Emotional Eating

  Enlarge Photo    
Tuesday, September 15, 2009

EMOTIONAL HEALTH

Calorie-Free Comfort

"50 Ways to Soothe

Yourself Without Food"

(New Harbinger Publications)

Crafting instead of Kit Kats? Journaling instead of jujubes? It's worth a shot. Psychologist Susan Albers, author of "Eating Mindfully," offers 50 exercises to end emotional eating. "If you eliminate eating as your main source of comfort, you have to find something helpful to put in its place." Albers wisely manages expectations in the introduction by saying that binge eaters and those with eating disorders ought to use this book as just one tool in a comprehensive treatment plan.

NUTRITION

Acceptable Behavior

The Fat Nutritionist

(http://www.fatnutritionist.com)

Would you trust a nutritionist who ate Twizzlers and ice cream for lunch and a bowl of bran cereal for dinner? Blogger Michelle Allison believes that, while her funky food choices one day last month were not a model of healthful eating, people's diets balance out over time. Besides, she writes, "I wanted it, I had it, and I felt pretty good about it." Allison, a 30-year-old Canadian nutrition student, is part of the fat acceptance movement; her blog's goal is to "help you get to a friendly place with food and your body." She serves it all up with sass: Her site's motto: "Eating normally is the new black."

FITNESS

He Went Thataway

"50/50"

(Grand Central Publishing)

In his new paperback, "ultramarathon man" Dean Karnazes recounts his experience running 50 marathons in 50 days in 50 states and reveals "how you too can achieve super endurance." (Other stats from the 2006 stunt: He ran 1,310 miles, burned through five pairs of shoes and lost three toenails.) His advice often falls into the "do what I say, not what I do" category. For example, he says runners need far more sleep than the 4 1/2 hours he averaged per night during the "Endurance 50." And runners should learn when their bodies are telling them to stop -- then stop. (Karnazes kept going.)

-- Rachel Saslow


© 2009 The Washington Post Company