Latest Entry: The RSS feed for this blog has moved

Washington Post staff writers offer a window into the art of obituary writing, the culture of death, and more about the end of the story.

Read more | What is this blog?

More From the Obits Section: Search the Archives  |   RSS Feeds RSS Feed   |   Submit an Obituary  |   Twitter Twitter
Obituaries

Obituaries

Network News

X Profile
View More Activity
Friday, September 18, 2009

Margaret L. King D.C. Librarian

Margaret L. King, 99, who held top positions with the D.C. Public Library for many years, died Aug. 19 at the Washington Home hospice in the District. She had vascular dementia.

Mrs. King joined the D.C. library system in 1949 and started its business division. She was acting director of the newly built Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library for several years in the 1970s and retired as chief of the library's fiction division in 1979.

Margaret Lydia Manley was born in Chicago and graduated summa cum laude from the University of Minnesota. She received a master's degree in library science from Catholic University in 1952 and was a member of the American Library Association.

In 1937, she married R. Sherwood King, whose 1938 novel, "If I Die Before I Wake," was the basis for the Orson Welles movie "The Lady From Shanghai." They were divorced in 1954.

Survivors include three children, Jeffery Sherwood King and Margaret Sherry King, both of Washington, and Randolph Richard King of New York City.

-- Matt Schudel

Clarence N. Lee Coast Guard Property Officer

Clarence N. Lee, 87, a retired property officer with the Coast Guard, died Aug. 27 of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Honolulu. He had homes in Bethesda and Honolulu.

Mr. Lee held various positions as a civilian employee at Coast Guard headquarters in Washington from 1952 to 1979, ultimately becoming a property officer, charged with keeping track of Coast Guard materials.

From 1981 to 1987, he lived in Belgrade, Vienna and Islamabad, where his wife was stationed with the U.S. Information Agency. In Islamabad, he taught Korean at the U.S. Embassy.

Clarence Nolan Lee was born in Honolulu and helped clean up damage after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941. He served in an Army grave registration unit during and after World War II.


CONTINUED     1                 >

More in the Obituary Section

Post Mortem

Post Mortem

The art of obituary writing, the culture of death, and more about the end of the story.

From the Archives

From the Archives

Read Washington Post obituaries and view multimedia tributes to Pope John Paul II, Ronald Reagan, James Brown and more.

[Campaign Finance]

A Local Life

This weekly feature takes a more personal look at extraordinary people in the D.C. area.

© 2009 The Washington Post Company

Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity