Nation Digest

Nation Digest: Obama Campaign's Yosi Sergant Quits

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Friday, September 25, 2009

NEA CONTROVERSY

Obama Campaign's Yosi Sergant Quits

Yosi Sergant, who became well known during Barack Obama's presidential campaign for his work with artist Shepard Fairey around the iconic "hope" poster, resigned Thursday from his job at the National Endowment for the Arts.

Sergant had come to Washington to work in the Office of Public Engagement at the White House. He moved to the NEA in May and was reassigned from his post as communications director two weeks ago after coming under fire from conservative Fox News Channel host Glenn Beck.

Beck accused Sergant of arranging an August conference call with the Office of Public Engagement and United We Serve, a service initiative of the administration, to recruit artists to create works in support of Obama policies.

The White House instructed agency chiefs of staff on Tuesday to be mindful of avoiding the appearance of acting politically.

-- Garance Franke-Ruta

and Michael A. Fletcher

TERRORISM CASE

N.C. Men Allegedly Targeted Quantico

Two North Carolina men who were accused this summer of conspiring to support terrorists overseas planned to kill military personnel at the U.S. Marine Corps base at Quantico, federal prosecutors alleged Thursday.

A federal grand jury returned new charges in the case, alleging that Daniel Patrick Boyd, 39, obtained maps and undertook reconnaissance of the base and that he owned armor-piercing ammunition that he said was "to attack the Americans," according to the U.S. attorney for the eastern district of North Carolina. Hysen Sherifi, 24, also was charged.

Boyd, a Muslim convert raised in Alexandria, was charged in July with leading a group of seven men in their 20s and early 30s who wanted to export violent jihad to the Middle East. All are being held without bail at a prison in Virginia.

-- Spencer S. Hsu

Kennedy Replacement Named: Massachusetts Gov. Deval L. Patrick (D) on Thursday named Paul Kirk, a former aide to the late senator Edward M. Kennedy, to temporarily fill his seat. Kirk made clear that he would not run in special elections to fill the rest of Kennedy's term.

-- From News Services


© 2009 The Washington Post Company

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