Nation Digest

Nation Digest: Rep. Grayson Won't Apologize for 'Die Quickly' Remarks

Convicted sex offender John Evander Couey, who was awaiting execution, has died of natural causes.
Convicted sex offender John Evander Couey, who was awaiting execution, has died of natural causes. (Scott Iskowitz - AP)
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Thursday, October 1, 2009

U.S. HOUSE

Another Day, Another Stinging Remark

House Republicans on Wednesday demanded an apology from Rep. Alan Grayson (D-Fla.) for saying from the floor of the chamber, "Republicans want you to die quickly," and brandishing a sign with a similar message.

Republicans even drafted a resolution that criticized Grayson for his remarks, stating that his behavior "was a breach of decorum and degraded the integrity and proceedings of the House," and that the House "disapproves of the behavior." The language was a direct echo of what Democrats used in their resolution admonishing Rep. Joe Wilson (R-S.C.) for yelling "You lie!" during President Obama's address to a joint session of Congress.

But Rep. Tom Price (R-Ga.) decided not to introduce the resolution, instead asking "respectfully . . . that he apologize to our leader."

Grayson made it clear that he would not be doing that. Instead, he said from the House floor that the only people who deserved an apology were those who did not have health insurance. "I apologize to the dead and their families that we haven't voted sooner to end this holocaust in America," he said.

-- Ben Pershing

WHITE HOUSE

NIH Grants Target Diseases, Economy

The National Institutes of Health has awarded $5 billion in grants to accelerate research into a broad range of diseases, the largest infusion of money to date into biomedical research, President Obama announced.

The money, which has been parceled out in 12,000 grants that have reached all 50 states in the past month, were part of the $787 billion economic stimulus package enacted in February.

Obama said the flood of research money would boost the development of advanced treatments for diseases such as cancer and heart disease, while also creating tens of thousands of jobs over the next two years.

"These investments will save jobs, they'll create new jobs -- tens of thousands of jobs -- conducting research, and manufacturing and supplying medical equipment, and building and modernizing laboratories and research facilities all across America," Obama said at an NIH event to highlight the grants


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