» This Story:Read +| Comments
Post Politics
New home.
Still the best political coverage.

Health-Care Overhaul 2010

Tracking the national health-care debate | More »

States Resist Medicaid Growth

President Barack Obama meets with governors in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, June 24, 2009. From left are, the president, Vermont Gov. Jim Douglas, Washington Gov. Christine Gregoire, and South Dakota Gov. Mike Rounds. The governors co-hosted the Regional Forums on Health Reforms earlier this year. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
President Barack Obama meets with governors in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, June 24, 2009. From left are, the president, Vermont Gov. Jim Douglas, Washington Gov. Christine Gregoire, and South Dakota Gov. Mike Rounds. The governors co-hosted the Regional Forums on Health Reforms earlier this year. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais) (Pablo Martinez Monsivais - AP)

Network News

X Profile
View More Activity
By Shailagh Murray
Washington Post Staff Writer
Monday, October 5, 2009

The nation's governors are emerging as a formidable lobbying force as health-care reform moves through Congress and states overburdened by the recession brace for the daunting prospect of providing coverage to millions of low-income residents.

This Story

The legislation the Senate Finance Committee is expected to approve this week calls for the biggest expansion of Medicaid since its creation in 1965. Under the Senate bill and a similar House proposal, a patchwork state-federal insurance program targeted mainly at children, pregnant women and disabled people would effectively become a Medicare for the poor, a health-care safety net for all people with an annual income below $14,404.

Whether Medicaid can absorb a huge influx of beneficiaries is a matter of grave concern to many governors, who have cut low-income health benefits -- along with school funding, prison construction, state jobs and just about everything else -- to cope with the most severe economic downturn in decades.

"I can't think of a worse time for this bill to be coming," said Tennessee Gov. Phil Bredesen (D), a member of the National Governors Association's health-care task force. "I'd love to see it happen. But nobody's going to put their state into bankruptcy or their education system in the tank for it."

These fears are resonating with members of Congress and have already yielded some important legislative changes, including alterations to the Senate Finance bill, which includes billions of dollars in additional funding, added after governors raised a fury about the original, lower sum. But House and Senate negotiators are reluctant to make further concessions, and in recent days, House Democrats have debated whether to trim Medicaid funding in their bill to make room for other priorities.

Yet lawmakers are wary about imposing a huge new burden on an imperfect program that serves one of the most challenging segments of the population, through a fragmented network of state-run systems. Among the 11 million people the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office estimates will sign up for Medicaid under the new rules, many are single adults and parents who have gone for years without health coverage. Many of these individuals also live in communities that lack the services to treat them.

"States are already at a breaking point, and so they should be thankful that this bill is only going to cost them an additional $30 billion," Sen. Charles E. Grassley (Iowa), the ranking Republican on the Finance Committee, told colleagues during the panel's two-week-long debate on reform. But Grassley added: "We are deluding ourselves, though, if we think that we are going to do anything in this bill to make Medicaid a better program for the people it serves."

The response from Democratic governors to the new burdens that may be imposed on them has ranged from enthusiastic to restrained. On Thursday, the Democratic Governors Association delivered a letter to House and Senate leaders signed by 22 of its members. It was silent on Medicaid but lauded the broader reform effort as essential. "We recognize that health reform is a shared responsibility and everyone, including state governments, needs to partner to reform our broken health care system," the letter noted.

Yet congressional Democrats are sufficiently alarmed about the potential impact that they already are seeking special protections for their states. Even Senate Majority Leader Harry M. Reid cut a deal with Senate Finance Committee Chairman Max Baucus (Mont.) to ensure that the federal government would pay the full cost of expanding Medicaid in Reid's state, Nevada.

Reid, who faces a potentially difficult 2010 reelection bid, responded to a Republican outcry over his stealth move by pointing to Nevada's crippling foreclosure crisis. "I make no apologies, none, for helping people in my state and our nation who are hurting the most," Reid said on the Senate floor.

Among the most vocal opponents of Medicaid expansion are Republican governors from Southern and rural Western states that offer minimal coverage under current law and are less equipped to handle an influx of new beneficiaries, compared with more urban states with better-established social-services infrastructures. The list includes Mississippi, governed by Haley Barbour, chairman of the Republican Governors Association. Barbour denounced the proposed Medicaid expansion at a news conference last month as a "huge unfunded mandate" likely to result in state tax increases.

The wake-up call for the nonpartisan National Governors Association came early in the summer, when Baucus and Grassley announced that they were considering only a temporary increase in federal funding to pay for new Medicaid enrollees. NGA leaders mobilized through their health-care task force, and after a round of conference calls with committee negotiators and bilateral talks between individual governors and senators, the temporary increase was made permanent.


CONTINUED     1        >

» This Story:Read +| Comments

More in the Politics Section

Campaign Finance -- Presidential Race

2008 Fundraising

See who is giving to the '08 presidential candidates.

Latest Politics Blog Updates

© 2009 The Washington Post Company

Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity