» This Story:Read +|Watch +|Talk +| Comments
Page 2 of 3   <       >

Heroic civilian police officer 'walked up and engaged' shooter

As investigations into the the Nov. 5 massacre at the Fort Hood, Tex. army base ensue, the military community deals with the realities of violence at home and abroad.

Network News

X Profile
View More Activity

Medics pulled off his camouflage top and began to treat his wounds, said Sgt. Andrew Hagerman, a military police soldier at the scene. Hasan and three other badly injured soldiers were flown by helicopter to Scott & White Hospital in nearby Temple, Tex.

This Story
View All Items in This Story
View Only Top Items in This Story

Soldiers loaded other victims, several shot multiple times, into cars and sped them to Darnall Army Medical Center, about one mile away, witnesses said.

"It was very moving. They were carrying their wounded buddies into the emergency room," said Janet DiPalma, a nurse at the facility.

At Darnell, some troops ripped off their camouflage tops and fashioned T-shirts into makeshift bandages and tourniquets, said Sgt. Howard Appleby, who had gone to the hospital to meet with a psychiatrist for post traumatic stress and quickly found himself helping with the wounded.

"It was just like being back in Iraq," Appleby said.

Several of the wounded soldiers lay on their stretchers and prayed. Others asked for cell phones to call their spouses and let them know they were wounded.

"It was a lot of rounds fired," said Maj. Stephen Beckwith, a doctor at the facility. "It was hard to imagine one person did all that shooting."

Most of the wounded had been shot two or three times in the chest, stomach or neck, said Maj. Stephen Beckwith, a doctor at the facility, who like many others at the hospital said he had dealt with similar mass casualties while serving in Iraq.

"I was in Iraq for 15 months. When you are in Iraq you are prepared for this to happen," he said.

Cone called Munley "one of our most impressive young police officers," and said she responded to the shooting rampage just as she was trained to do.

"If you act aggressively to take out a shooter, you will have less fatalities," Cone said.

No one answered the door Friday at Munley's house, a brick home on a tidy block on the outskirts of Killeen, an area that is home primarily to current or former members of the military.


<       2        >

» This Story:Read +|Watch +|Talk +| Comments
© 2009 The Washington Post Company

Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity