Obituaries

Obituaries

Monday, December 7, 2009

Angelina Casamento Taylor Volunteer, Homemaker

Angelina Casamento Taylor, 82, a homemaker, volunteer and part-time Rockville Senior Center employee, died of sepsis Nov. 24 at Shady Grove Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Rockville. She lived in Rockville.

Mrs. Taylor, a native Washingtonian and graduate of Western High School, worked in the payroll department for the Veterans Administration in the 1940s. She met her future husband at a USO dance, and they married in 1951.

While raising her family, Mrs. Taylor belonged to the PTA, volunteered at Rockville schools and prepared meals on wheels through St. Mary's Catholic Church in Rockville. She also belonged to Sons of Italy, a social group for Italian Americans.

When the Rockville Senior Center opened in 1982, Mrs. Taylor was the youngest member to join, her children said. She volunteered, co-taught an aerobic exercise program and helped with the Tuesday supper club. She ran the snack bar at midweek bingo games and served refreshments at other events.

A son, Marine Col. John Michael Taylor, died in 2002.

Survivors include her husband of 58 years, John H. Taylor of Rockville; two children, Patrick Anthony Taylor of Aspen Hill and Sue Ann Ketchum of Damascus; a sister, Alvira Wrothen of Clinton; four brothers, Phillip Casamento of Linthicum Heights, Joe Casamento of Bethesda, Sam Casamento of Washington and Frank Casamento of Cabin John; four grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

-- Patricia Sullivan

Carleton 'Carl' Ruthling Computer Scientist

Carleton "Carl" Ruthling, 76, a retired computer scientist who worked for companies such as Computer Science Corp. and Univac and who was active in community outreach programs, died Nov. 29 at Reston Hospital Center. He had pneumonia.

Mr. Ruthling, a Vienna resident, worked in the computer field from the late 1950s to mid-1990s and at one time was project manager for a third-generation computer created by Sperry Rand, the equipment and electronics company.

In the late 1960s, he helped start Annandale Christian Community for Action, a coalition of churches that helps low-income families. He also helped raise money to start a hotline for troubled teenagers in Northern Virginia.


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