Biden going to Iraq due to concerns about candidates barred from elections

An Iraqi demonstrator rips a poster of Iraqi lawmaker Dhafir al-Ani in Basra, Iraq, Thursday, Jan. 21, 2010. Al-Ani was banned from running in the March 7 vote because he had allegedly promoted former leader Saddam Hussein's ruling Baathist Party. The party is banned in Iraq. Iraq's president said Thursday a high-level commission will investigate the legitimacy of a decision to ban candidates from running in the March 7 parliamentary election. (AP Photo/Nabil Al-Jurani)
An Iraqi demonstrator rips a poster of Iraqi lawmaker Dhafir al-Ani in Basra, Iraq, Thursday, Jan. 21, 2010. Al-Ani was banned from running in the March 7 vote because he had allegedly promoted former leader Saddam Hussein's ruling Baathist Party. The party is banned in Iraq. Iraq's president said Thursday a high-level commission will investigate the legitimacy of a decision to ban candidates from running in the March 7 parliamentary election. (AP Photo/Nabil Al-Jurani) (Nabil Al-jurani - AP)

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By Leila Fadel
Thursday, January 21, 2010; 6:51 PM

Baghdad -- Alarmed that the disqualification of hundreds of candidates from upcoming parliamentary elections threatens to derail Iraq's fledgling democracy, the Obama administration is dispatching Vice President Biden in hopes of defusing the looming political crisis.

The expected visit showcases U.S. concerns that the decision to bar 511 candidates -- the most prominent of whom are Sunni Arabs -- could stoke sectarian violence and undermine elections as the U.S. military prepares to significantly reduce its presence here. The removal of candidates purportedly adhering to the ideals of Saddam Hussein's Baath Party could reverse efforts to bring disenfranchised Sunni communities into the fold and inflame old divisions, wiping out the security gains of the U.S. surge.

If the Americans "fail in guaranteeing democracy, they should leave right away from Iraq, because their presence means nothing," said Saleh al-Mutlak, a prominent Sunni lawmaker now barred from running. "If they can't protect democracy, then what are they here for?"

U.S. officials are in a precarious position as they try to soften the effort to ban supposed Baathists. They are stuck between the government they created and bolstered -- a coalition of mostly sect- and ethnic-based coalitions dominated by Shiite Arabs -- and politicians who have been branded as loyalists to the dictator deposed during the U.S.-led invasion.

"The United States is very sensitive about the Sunni situation," said Ezzat Shahbandar, a secular Shiite lawmaker allied with Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki's State of Law coalition. "This is the hot area, and armed groups could use any political reason to fight again."

On Thursday, President Jalal Talabani said he welcomed the expected visit by Biden but warned that the Iraqi government would not succumb to U.S. pressure.

"We are an independent country and will not receive orders from anyone, whether it is a brotherly Arab country, a neighboring country or a friend," he said. "Mr. Biden made proposals, but we are committed to safeguard and uphold this constitution."

Biden's expected visit follows a round of calls to top Iraqi officials, including Talabani and Maliki, suggesting that they postpone the vetting of candidates for Baathist connections until after the elections, Iraqi officials said.

U.S. officials have said rooting out Baathists from public office should be done in a transparent way, and they have raised concerns about the scope and timing of the disqualification effort in meetings with Iraqi officials.

Obama administration officials said that they knew the disqualifications were coming but that they were taken aback by the length of a list they initially were led to believe would contain no more than 15 candidates. After Biden's talks in the past week with Maliki, Talabani and others, the administration is convinced that Iraqi political leaders realize the seriousness of the situation and are "constructively engaged in looking for a way forward," said one senior administration official in Washington.

The problem, he said, is that "no one wants to be perceived as defending the rights of Baathists" and no Iraqi decision-maker wants to be the first to publicly declare that the ruling must be reversed.

The administration is less concerned with how the problem is resolved than the speed with which a solution is found. If ballots are not printed within the next week to 10 days, the March date for the elections will be difficult to keep, the official said.


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