How Supreme Court voted on Citizens United v. FCC

Friday, January 22, 2010; A04

FOR THE MAJORITY

Roberts

Alito

Scalia

Thomas

Kennedy

FOR THE MINORITY

Stevens

Sotomayor

Breyer

Ginsberg

The Opinions

From an opinion concurring with the majority:

Chief Justice

John G. Roberts Jr.:

"The Government urges us in this case to uphold a direct prohibition on political speech. It asks us to embrace a theory of the First Amendment that would allow censorship not only of television and radio broadcasts, but of pamphlets, posters, the Internet, and virtually any other medium that corporations and unions might find useful in expressing their views on matters of public concern. . . . The First Amendment protects more than just the individual on a soapbox and the lonely pamphleteer."

For the dissenters:

Justice John Paul Stevens:

"At bottom, the Court's opinion is thus a rejection of the common sense of the American people, who have recognized a need to prevent corporations from undermining self-government since the founding, and who have fought against the distinctive corrupting potential of corporate electioneering since the days of Theodore Roosevelt. It is a strange time to repudiate that common sense. While American democracy is imperfect, few outside the majority of this Court would have thought its flaws included a dearth of corporate money in politics."

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