Coverage faulted in bowling, women's basketball and wrestling

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Saturday, January 30, 2010

I was extremely disappointed by the scant attention you gave to a historic sports feat.

At the very bottom of a Sports Digest on Page D2 Monday, under a headline of "Misc." and a picture of a tennis player, were 11 lines devoted to Kelly Kulick becoming the first woman to win a title on the men's professional bowling tour. She defeated Chris Barnes in the Professional Bowlers Association's Tournament of Champions in Las Vegas on Sunday.

Kulick's achievement surpasses anything Annika Sorenstam or Michelle Wie has accomplished in golf, but the golfers received extensive coverage for their efforts.

Tim Parr, Fairfax

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As the NCAA women's basketball season is in full swing, I buy the Sunday Post for TV Week's information on scheduled games. Exciting women's teams such as Connecticut, Tennessee, Duke and our own University of Maryland attract more and more broadcast coverage on ESPN, ESPN2 and CSN.

But TV Week's sports overview lists only men's basketball for the week. As a professor of women's sports history who teaches a popular course called "Athletics and Gender" at George Washington and Georgetown universities, I am dismayed to find such overt discrimination. Why can't TV Week list the women's college events up front as well?

Bonnie J. Morris,

Washington

The University of Maryland wrestling team is ranked 10th in the country. Hudson Taylor (197 pounds) has more career wins that any wrestler in Maryland history. The Terps wrestled Navy on Jan. 22 and North Carolina State and Duke on Jan. 23.

Your Jan. 24 Sunday Sports section had nothing on wrestling -- not even scores -- yet had room for full coverage of area college basketball games and another daily article about the Washington Wizards, who are unlikely to win a third of their games this season.

Why do you think putting a ball in an 18-inch hole is so much more important than wrestling, which requires greater self-discipline and top-flight physical conditioning?

Robin Ficker, Boyds


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