Post Politics
New home.
Still the best political coverage.

Health-Care Overhaul 2010

Tracking the national health-care debate | More »

Insurers report on use of abortion riders

Rep. Bart Stupak (D-Mich.), talking with Elin Richardson after a town hall meeting, threatens to oppose a Senate bill that he and others say falls short of maintaining the ban on federal funding for abortion.
Rep. Bart Stupak (D-Mich.), talking with Elin Richardson after a town hall meeting, threatens to oppose a Senate bill that he and others say falls short of maintaining the ban on federal funding for abortion. (Carlos Osorio/associated Press)

Network News

X Profile
View More Activity
By Peter Slevin
Washington Post Staff Writer
Sunday, March 14, 2010

CHICAGO -- In North Dakota, where insurers can cover abortions if customers pay a separate premium, the state's largest provider says it sells no abortion policies because no one has asked to buy one.

Amid a high-stakes debate over abortion that could determine the fate of President Obama's health-care initiative, North Dakota's law offers a test because it is much like the language favored by antiabortion lawmakers on Capitol Hill, notably Rep. Bart Stupak (D-Mich.).

"There's not a lot to tell. We have no member who elected to have abortion riders," said Denise Kolpack, vice president of Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Dakota, which covers about 80 percent of the North Dakota market. "We would be legally bound to provide an offering, but we have no groups that have requested it."

Similar policies are in place in Kentucky, Missouri, Idaho and Oklahoma.

"It is rare that we hear in the market that an employer would request a rider for this coverage," said Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield spokesman Tony Felts, whose territory includes Kentucky.

In congressional discussions about health-care reform, the debate over how abortion would be treated has been fractious, particularly among Democrats. Stupak and others threaten to oppose a Senate bill that they say falls short of maintaining the three-decade-old ban on federal funding for abortion.

Stupak's amendment to the House bill, passed 240 to 194 in November, with 64 Democrats voting yes, would prohibit insurers from including abortion coverage for anyone who receives a federal subsidy. Much like laws in North Dakota and the four other states, however, insurers could offer coverage if customers buy a separate rider.

In the Senate, language drafted by Sen. Ben Nelson (D-Neb.) would allow companies to offer abortion coverage, without a rider, in policies sold on new insurance exchanges. But customers would need to send a separate check for the portion that covers abortion, perhaps $1 a month. Individual states could also bar from their exchanges any policies covering abortion.

In the five states where abortion coverage is prohibited except with a rider, it is unclear how customers who purchase group insurance, typically for their employees, learn about the abortion coverage option.

"I'm not sure if an employer would know that or not," Felts said of customers in Kentucky, when asked whether Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield advertises its policies. He said that if a customer requested abortion coverage, the company would offer it "in compliance" with state law.

Blue Cross of Idaho spokesman Stewart Johnson said, "I don't know that we would mention it. They would probably ask about it." He said the company does not track how often a group purchases abortion insurance.

"There's an information gap, clearly," said Elizabeth Nash, a researcher at the Guttmacher Institute, which supports abortion rights. "A lot of people don't know if their health plan covers abortion because nobody wants to be in that situation."


CONTINUED     1        >

More in the Politics Section

Campaign Finance -- Presidential Race

2008 Fundraising

See who is giving to the '08 presidential candidates.

Latest Politics Blog Updates

© 2010 The Washington Post Company

Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity