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Army tops Navy, Maryland nips Hopkins in lacrosse

By Christian Swezey
Sunday, April 18, 2010; D07

BALTIMORE -- The 88th Army-Navy men's lacrosse game ended as the football game does, with the losing team's alma mater performed followed by the winning team's.

Navy's alma mater went second, but it was only because of a mistake. It was Army celebrating a 7-6 victory in the first game of the Day of Rivals before 20,911 on Saturday at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore.

In the second game, fourth-ranked Maryland took advantage of two Johns Hopkins penalties in the final seconds of the third quarter to score two extra-man goals early in the fourth quarter, then held on for a 10-9 victory.

Army led 7-6 when Navy sophomore Nikk Davis appeared to tie the game with 37 seconds to play. Davis scored, landed in the crease and dislodged the goal within an instant of each other and not necessarily in that order.

Had it been ruled that the ball went into the goal before Davis landed in the crease or dislodged the goal, the score would have counted.

But two of the three referees ruled that Davis had been in the crease before the ball went into the net. (The third, with the best view of the play, was ready to allow the goal.) Navy was given an extra-man possession but the goal was disallowed.

"Once I saw the flag and the ball went in, I'm not trying to be facetious or a wise guy on this, but usually when you see the flag and the ball's in the goal they count the goal," Navy Coach Richie Meade said.

The selector of referees for the NCAA tournament initially said it was the correct call but after watching two replays he said the goal probably should have counted.

Navy (5-7, 4-2 Patriot League) had two shots after that but one was saved and the other was blocked as time expired.

It was one of 11 blocked shots -- out of 38 total shots -- on a day when both teams were well-prepared for the other team's offense and players were doing anything to get in front of shots never mind that they were sometimes traveling 70 mph or more.

The game came down to a pair of offensive players on each team. Those from Navy -- senior midfielders Joe Lennon and Patrick Moran -- combined for 1-for-16 shooting. Moran, the team leader with 22 goals, went 0 for 11.

Meantime, the pair from Army (6-5, 4-0) -- junior attackman Jeremy Boltus and freshman attackman Garrett Thul -- combined for five goals, including the winning goal by Boltus with 4 minutes 29 seconds left to play. It was the third goal for Boltus.

In the second game, Maryland (8-2) led 6-5 in the final seconds of the third quarter when the No. 16 Blue Jays were called for two penalties, including a one-minute non-releasable on junior Orry Michael.

With the two-man advantage, Maryland junior Travis Reed scored for a 7-5 lead.

One penalty was released after the goal but not the second. And following a faceoff win and timeout, junior Grant Catalino scored for an 8-5 lead with 14:25 to play.

The Blue Jays (5-6) trailed 10-7 with two minutes to play. They closed to 10-9 following back-to-back goals by seniors Steven Boyle (three goals) and Michael Kimmel but did not get another shot.

-- LOYOLA 11, GEORGETOWN 6: The host Greyhounds scored four goals in the third period, while becoming the first team this season to hold the eighth-ranked Hoyas scoreless in a quarter, to earn their fifth straight win.

Collin Finnerty scored with 11 minutes 50 seconds left in the quarter to break a 4-4 halftime tie, Matt Langan added a goal 51 seconds later and Eric Lusby scored two goals 1:24 apart to give No. 9 Loyola (8-2) an 8-4 lead.

The six goals scored by Georgetown (7-4) were its fewest of the season. Rickey Mirabito paced the Hoyas, who had their three-game winning streak snapped, with two goals and an assist.

Max Seligmann added two goals.

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