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Army ready to take drastic action to clear up record-keeping at Arlington Cemetery

Secretary of the Army John McHugh hears from an assistant while testifying before the House Armed Services Committee about a report on mismanagement at Arlington National Cemetery.
Secretary of the Army John McHugh hears from an assistant while testifying before the House Armed Services Committee about a report on mismanagement at Arlington National Cemetery. (Chip Somodevilla/getty Images)

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By Michael E. Ruane
Washington Post Staff Writer
Thursday, July 1, 2010

The secretary of the Army said Wednesday that officials were prepared to dig up graves, open caskets and take DNA samples from the deceased if it is necessary to sort out the record-keeping chaos at Arlington National Cemetery.

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"If we are so authorized and if it is necessary, we have not ruled out the possibility of actually opening caskets," said Army Secretary John McHugh, noting that it would be an extreme measure, ". . . and should it thereafter become necessary for DNA . . . that would be something we would contemplate."

McHugh spoke at a hearing of the House Armed Services Committee called to look into recent revelations of mismanagement, mishandling of remains and extensive record foul-ups at the nation's most hallowed cemetery.

A probe by the Army inspector general, unveiled June 10, found a wide array of long-standing problems at the cemetery.

Among other problems, the Army found 211 discrepancies between burial maps and grave sites and cases in which funeral urns were inadvertently dug up and dumped in a dirt pile.

McHugh said investigators already are digging into some of the 117 sites without tombstones or burial cards that are marked as occupied on cemetery maps to see whether anyone is buried there. No names were associated with the map sites.

Five have been examined so far, an Army spokesman said. In each case "the map was in error," McHugh said. "There were no remains in those graves, and those graves will be reclaimed and reused for appropriate purposes and a fallen hero sometime in the future."

The Army also found 94 graves that had tombstones and burial cards but were not listed on cemetery maps. Twenty-two of those sites have been probed so far and found to be occupied, a cemetery spokeswoman said.

Committee Chairman Ike Skelton (D-Mo.) said he thinks a complete survey of graves at the cemetery should be conducted to check for burial mistakes.

Skelton said the Army 's recent investigation into mistakes at the cemetery was so "limited" that it probably revealed "only a fraction of the problem."

"We must be prepared that a 100 percent survey of the cemetery and all its operations, which I believe must now be undertaken, will yield a larger number of problems that must be addressed," Skelton said.

The Army has focused, so far, on only three of the cemetery's 70 sections. McHugh said a complete cemetery survey was possible but would be difficult.


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