DIGEST

Auto manufacturers want to put brakes on Mass. right-to-repair law

NEW YORK The water was fine for athletes diving into the Hudson River during the 1500-meter swim portion of Sunday's 10th annual Nautica New York City Triathlon competition. Participants then completed a 40k bike along Manhattan's West Side and a 10k run through Central Park.
NEW YORK The water was fine for athletes diving into the Hudson River during the 1500-meter swim portion of Sunday's 10th annual Nautica New York City Triathlon competition. Participants then completed a 40k bike along Manhattan's West Side and a 10k run through Central Park. (Dario Cantatore/getty Images)
Monday, July 19, 2010

Big auto firms want to put brakes on law

Mom-and-pop repair shops in Massachusetts are pushing a bill that would require auto manufacturers to provide, at a price, all the diagnostic and software information they make available to their dealerships.

Massachusetts would become the first state to approve the so-called auto right-to-repair law. The Senate recently passed it, and it's pending in the House. Industry observers say passage of the bill in Massachusetts could drive similar legislative efforts in other states.

Car dealers and manufacturers, including Honda, have vigorously opposed the right-to-repair bill on the federal level and in other states, such as New Jersey and Arizona. They say the push for the bill isn't about consumers but about auto parts.

A spokesman for the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers, an association of 11 vehicle manufacturers including Chrysler Group, Ford Motor and General Motors, said aftermarket parts companies are seeking information that would enable them to make inexpensive parts in foreign countries without incurring research and development costs.

"This is a thinly veiled attempt by parts manufacturers to lower the cost of remanufacturing original equipment of manufacturer parts," alliance spokesman Charles Territo said.

Supporters of the bill say it's about giving consumers choices.

"Consumers pay a lot of money for cars, and they should be able to choose where they can get them repaired," said Art Kinsman, spokesman for the Right to Repair Coalition, which represents more than 1,000 Massachusetts mechanics supporting the legislation.

Midsize and large repair shops also have said they would benefit from a right-to-repair law.

-- Associated Press

International sales promising for Boeing

Boeing said it sees potential for international orders for 30 of its C-17 military transport aircraft over the next five years.


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