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D.C. Community Calendar, July 22-29, 2010

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Thursday, July 22, 2010

Thursday 22

BEHIND THE SCENES CATHEDRAL TOURS, for age 11 and older, docents lead visitors to seldom-seen areas for a closer view of stained-glass windows, gargoyles and other works of art and architecture; be prepared for stair climbing, close quarters and heights. 10:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. weekdays, Washington National Cathedral, Wisconsin and Massachusetts avenues NW. $10. 202-537-6200, http://www.nationalcathedral.org or specialtours@cathedral.org.

JOHN GUERNSEY, JAZZ PIANIST, Noon-1 p.m., Old Post Office Pavilion, 1100 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. Free. 202-289-4224.

"NATIVE AMERICAN VETERANS: STORYTELLING FOR HEALING," Minda Martin's documentary, with nine veterans of World War II, Vietnam, Persian Gulf and Operation Iraqi Freedom recalling their experiences. 12:30 p.m. daily through July 31, National Museum of the American Indian, Rasmuson Theater, Fourth Street and Independence Avenue SW. Free. 202-633-1000.

DOCUMENTARY: "FREE LAND," Minda Martin's look at her parents' homelessness vs. her ancestors' homelessness caused by the forced removal of the Cherokee people from their lands 170 years earlier. 3:30 p.m. daily through July 31, National Museum of the American Indian, Rasmuson Theater, Fourth Street and Independence Avenue SW. Free. 202-633-1000.

JAZZ CONCERT, performance by musicians chosen by institutions in Quito, Ecuador. 6 p.m., Kennedy Center, Millennium Stage, 2700 F St. NW. Free. 202-467-4600.

THOMAS JEFFERSON PORTRAIT TALK, curator Brandon Fortune discusses the Mather Brown portrait and achievements of the former president. 6 p.m., National Portrait Gallery, Eighth and F streets NW. Free. 202-633-1000.

"SAVING PRIVATE RYAN," Steven Spielberg's 1998 film based on a post-D-Day mission to find a soldier behind enemy lines whose brothers were reportedly killed in action, starring Tom Hanks, Vin Diesel, Tom Sizemore and Edward Burns. 6:30 p.m., Smithsonian American Art Museum, Eighth and F streets NW. Free. 202-633-1000.

CATHEDRAL GARGOYLE TOUR, a docent leads an outside tour pointing out humorous and scary gargoyles and discussing their purpose; take binoculars and cameras. 6:30 p.m., Washington National Cathedral, Wisconsin and Massachusetts Avenues NW. $10; age 12 and younger, $5; family, $30. 202-537-6200.

ZOO JAZZ CONCERT, Steve Scott Project performs a mix of jazz, reggae, calypso and R&B music, take a picnic and a blanket or lawn chair. 6:30-8 p.m., National Zoo, on Lion/Tiger Hill, 3001 Connecticut Ave. NW. Free. 202-633-4085.

SECRETS FROM THE PAST: FROM ANCIENT TEXTS TO MODERN MEDICINE, Alain Touwaide, a historian in the botany department, National Museum of Natural History, and scientific director of the Institute for the Preservation of Medical Traditions, discusses the curative properties of plants and the integration of the knowledge into modern medicine. 6:45 p.m., S. Dillon Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson Dr. SW. $40. 202-633-3030.

MUSIC AT FORT RENO PARK, performance by Poor But Sexy; dogs and babies welcome. 7 p.m., Fort Reno Park, Chesapeake Street and Nebraska Avenue NW. Free. 202-355-6356 or http://www.fortreno.com.

"AVENUE Q," the Tony Award-winning puppet-and-people musical for adults, the story of a bright-eyed Princeton graduate who goes to New York with big dreams and a tiny bank account. 8 p.m. Thursdays-Fridays, 2 and 8 p.m. Saturdays, 2 and 7:30 p.m. Sundays, 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays-Wednesdays, continues through Aug. 15, Lansburgh Theatre, 450 Seventh St. NW. $75-$85. 202-547-1122 or http://www.shakespearetheatre.org.


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