Anyway you slice it, doesn't a six-blade razor feel excessive?

SHARP MINDS: "Manufacturers have realized that the blade market could be worth much more than the razor market," says one expert.
SHARP MINDS: "Manufacturers have realized that the blade market could be worth much more than the razor market," says one expert. (Preston Keres/the Washington Post)

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By Monica Hesse
Washington Post Staff Writer
Saturday, July 24, 2010

It has come to our attention that ShaveMate, in its efforts to break into a stubble market dominated by Schick and Gillette, has recently introduced the ShaveMate Titan 6, which has six blades. Six.

We set out to find out why.

"It's not just the blades," says Lou Tomassetti who, along with his brother Peter, invented the Titan. "It's really everything you need in one." The Titan, he explains, also comes with shaving cream in the handle and a moisture strip.

"If you go out and try to buy equipment for shaving today," Lou continues, "it's very complicated."

"You might have to buy batteries," Peter adds.

"ShaveMate is really a lifestyle change" from all that, Lou says. "It's a shaving revolution."

Lou and Peter, it must be noted, call themselves the Inventor Brothers. In addition to razors, they specialize in a wide variety of horns, such as the Dog Horn Training Tool/Attack Deterrent.

But why stop at six? Why not eight? Why not go Spinal Tap, to 11? Why not invent a 49-blade mask that clips onto your face and vibrates the hair away? Why not cut to the chase already, Tomassetti brothers, and debut Titan 7?

"It's funny you should say that," says Lou, "but we think we hit the sweet spot."

We blame Gillette.

It was Gillette that first introduced the disposable-blade safety razor, back in 1904, replacing the straight-edge razor long favored by barbershops. It was Gillette that added a second blade in 1971, and that, in 1998, introduced the three-blade "Mach3" which, in ads, equated shaving with driving really fast cars through deserts.

Naturally, there were parodies. On "Saturday Night Live," Will Ferrell hawked the Platinum Mach14; "MadTV" advertised a Mach20: "The eighth blade sends an electronic pulse, which destroys the part of the brain responsible for hair growth!"


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