Incoming George Mason freshman will compete at Olympic trials for taekwondo team

Shaina Krause's second-place finish at the U.S. Taekwondo Senior National Championships in Orlando qualified her for a chance to compete at the 2012 Olympic team trials in Colorado Springs.
Shaina Krause's second-place finish at the U.S. Taekwondo Senior National Championships in Orlando qualified her for a chance to compete at the 2012 Olympic team trials in Colorado Springs. (Ian Fatzinger/fairfax County Times)
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By Reed S. Albers
Fairfax County Times
Thursday, July 29, 2010

Dressed in street clothes, Shaina Krause shares much in common with the typical 18-year-old woman preparing for her first year of college. She enjoys movies with friends, shopping at the mall and even wears trendy Silly Bandz bracelets.

But in a taekwondo kimono, the rising George Mason University freshman transforms into a fierce 5-foot-7 martial artist who possibly could compete at the 2012 Summer Olympic Games in London.

"When I started watching the Olympics, I knew that I wanted to be there," she said.

Her Olympic dream is just a few tournaments away from coming true.

Krause's second-place finish at the U.S. Taekwondo Senior National Championships in Orlando on July 4 qualified her for a chance to compete at the 2012 Olympic team trials in Colorado Springs next year.

The second-place finish also allows her to vie for spots on the U.S. 2011 Pan American Games Team and 2011 World Taekwondo Team.

Krause, a member of the 2009 American Athletic Union Senior National Taekwondo Team, isn't obsessing about an Olympic trial that is a year away.

"I try not to think too far ahead about where I can go with taekwondo," she said. "I just think about my upcoming fights."

A student at the Phan University of Martial Arts in Burke, Krause is focusing on the grueling training regimen she'll begin with her teacher, Q.V. Phan Le.

"The training is going to be tough," she said. "I've had to make sacrifices in my social life in the past, and I'm okay with doing it if it will help me" at the tournaments.

A typical training day consists of four hours of conditioning in the morning, hours of sparring later in the day and tactical chalk talk at night, Le said.

"She can spend close to 16 hours training just on a Saturday," said Krause's father, Paul. "And she trains just about every single day."


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