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Body of Jarod Newlove, second missing U.S. sailor, found in Afghanistan

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By Joshua Partlow and Javed Hamdard
Washington Post Staff Writers
Friday, July 30, 2010

KABUL -- A second U.S. sailor who disappeared in eastern Afghanistan last week has been found dead.

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The discovery Wednesday ended the urgent search that had begun Friday evening when two U.S. Navy service members drove away from Camp Julien on the outskirts of Kabul and ended up in an apparent Taliban ambush in Logar province.

The two men, Petty Officer 2nd Class Justin McNeley, 30, of Wheat Ridge, Colo., and Petty Officer 3rd Class Jarod Newlove, 25, from the Seattle area, worked at NATO's counterinsurgency academy, where troops learn best practices in how to fight the Afghan war, NATO officials said.

U.S. troops had recovered McNeley's body Sunday morning, but they hoped that Newlove might be alive and could be found in the Charkh district of Logar, where he was believed to have been captured. But Wednesday evening, Newlove's body was found in Charkh in a village called Yousef, said Din Mohammad Darwish, a spokesman for the Logar governor.

Darwish said Newlove had been shot three times and might have been wounded in an initial attack Friday evening as the sailors drove their armored SUV through the area. NATO officials said that Newlove's body was found in the water and that he appeared to have been beaten to death.

Darwish said that early in the search the Taliban had been demanding the release of four insurgent commanders in return for Newlove but that no prisoner exchange was made.

It remains unclear how the two U.S. sailors drove into Logar province, a dangerous area south of Kabul where the Taliban controls swaths of territory. Some NATO officials said the men might have taken a wrong turn intending to head back to Kabul and found themselves on the road to Logar.

Hamdard is a special correspondent.


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