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Specifications on the 2010 Chrysler Sebring Limited

Sunday, August 1, 2010; F01

Ride, acceleration and handling: Adequate on flat, straight terrain. Acceleration and handling are poor in more challenging driving environments, such as curvaceous mountain roads.

Head-turning quotient: Attractive in a classic sort of way.

Body style/layout: The 2010 Sebring is a compact, front-engine, front-wheel-drive family sedan. It is also available as a convertible.

Engine/transmission: A 2.4-liter, 16-valve (with electronically controlled variable valve lift and timing for better fuel economy) four-cylinder engine is standard -- 173 horsepower, 166 foot-pounds of torque. The transmission is a four-speed automatic. A 2.7-liter V-6 engine (186 horsepower, 191 foot-pounds of torque) is available. But it consumes more fuel without a commensurate increase in performance, in part because it's also linked to an aging four-speed automatic transmission. It is not recommended by this column.

Capacities: Seats for five people. Maximum luggage capacity is 13.6 cubic feet. Fuel capacity is 16.9 gallons; regular gasoline is recommended.

Mileage: The federal rating is 21 miles per gallon in the city and 30 on the highway. But highway mileage improves by nearly two miles per gallon if you drive at posted speed limits.

Safety: Standard equipment includes four-wheel disc brakes (ventilated front, solid rear) and side and head air bags. Electronic stability and traction control is an option on the Sebring sedan. Get it.

Price: The base price on the 2010 Chrysler Sebring Limited sedan is $22,115. Dealer's invoice price on that model is $21,241. Price as tested is $25,075, including $2,210 in options (electronically operated glass roof, air conditioning with automatic temperature control, premium sound system, electronic stability and traction control, tire-pressure monitoring) and a $750 destination charge. Dealer's price as tested is $23,958. Consumer rebates are available.

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