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D.C. community calendar, Aug. 19 to 26, 2010

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Thursday, August 19, 2010

Thursday, Aug. 19

"THE FOREIGN POLICY OF THOMAS JEFFERSON," a National Park Service ranger discusses Jefferson's policies and how he created them. 10 a.m., noon and 2 p.m., Thomas Jefferson Memorial, 900 Ohio Dr. SW. Free. David Hoffman, 202-233-3520.

NATIVE AMERICAN CULTURE, cultural interpreters engage visitors in hands-on activities that introduce them to a variety of Native American music, art, dance and more. 10 a.m.-noon and 1-3 p.m. Thursdays-Sundays, through Aug. 29, National Museum of the American Indian, Potomac Atrium, Fourth Street and Independence Avenue SW. Free. 202-633-1000.

BEHIND THE SCENES CATHEDRAL TOURS, for age 11 and older, docents show visitors stained-glass windows, gargoyles and other works of art and architecture; be prepared for stair climbing, close quarters and heights. 10:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. weekdays, through Aug. 31, Washington National Cathedral, Wisconsin and Massachusetts Avenues NW. $10. 202-537-6200, http://www.nationalcathedral.org or specialtours@cathedral.org.

CARTOGRAPHY TALK, Kislak fellow Alexander Hidalgo discusses "The Map in Garb: Clothing and Cartography in Spanish America." Noon, Library of Congress, Jefferson Building, Kluge Center Meeting Room, 10 First St. SE. Free. 202-707-2692.

"WE STRUGGLE, BUT WE EAT FRUIT," Bebito Piãko and Isaac Piãko's 2006 story of their Acre community, near the Peru border, and the way people organized to preserve a sustainable way of life on their logging-threatened lands, in Ashaninka with English subtitles. 12:30 p.m. daily, through Aug. 31, National Museum of the American Indian, Rasmuson Theater, Fourth Street and Independence Avenue SW. Free. 202-633-1000.

NATIONAL GALLERY LECTURE, Eric Denker discusses "In Memory of Caravaggio, 1571-1610." 1 p.m., National Gallery of Art, West Building, Sixth Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. 202-737-4215.

WHITE HOUSE AREA FARMERS MARKET, farm products, cheese and baked goods. 3-7 p.m. Thursdays, through Nov. 18, Freshfarm Market, Vermont Avenue NW, between H and I streets. 202-362-8889 or http://www.freshfarmmarkets.org.

PENN QUARTER FARMERS MARKET, shop for fruit, vegetables, flowers and more sold by area farmers. 3-7 p.m. Thursdays, through Sept. 2, Penn Quarter Freshfarm Market, Eighth and D streets NW. 202-362-8889 or http://www.freshfarmmarkets.org.

"POWER PATHS," Bo Boudart's 2009 story of the Navajo, Hopi and Lakota Sioux activists who use sustainable energy practices and try to protect their air, water and land from the damaging impact of coal mining and coal-fired power plants. 3:30 p.m., National Museum of the American Indian, Rasmuson Theater, Fourth Street and Independence Avenue SW. Free. 202-633-1000.

WOODLAND TRAIL HIKE, for age 5 and older, a National Park Service ranger leads an exploratory half-mile walk. 4 p.m., Rock Creek Park Nature Center, 5200 Glover Rd. NW. Free. 202-895-6070.

THE BRAD LINDE ENSEMBLE, the jazz saxophonist and his nine-piece Sax of a Kind ensemble perform a tribute to tenor saxophonist Lester Young. 5-8 p.m., Smithsonian American Art Museum, Kogod Courtyard, Eighth and F streets NW. Free. 202-633-1000.

"SHAKESPEARE FREE FOR ALL," members of the Shakespeare Theatre perform the comedy "Twelfth Night," a tale of love lost and found. 8 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays, 2 and 8 p.m. Saturdays, 2 and 7:30 p.m. Sundays, 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays and Wednesdays, through Sept. 5, Sidney Harman Hall, Shakespeare Theatre, 610 F St. NW. Free tickets (limit of two per person) available two hours before each performance. 202-547-1122 or http://www.shakespearetheatre.org.


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