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Learning ins, outs of life in NBA

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Wall said the importance of image and public perception was hammered home during a presentation by NBA deputy commissioner Adam Silver. Silver showed a poll from fans that revealed that NBA players have the greatest image problem of athletes in the three major sports.

"That ain't good," said Wall, who has been conscious of his image since he was 14 and joined the D-One Sports AAU program. His coaches and now advisers Brian and Dwon Clifton had a strict policy of no cornrows or tattoos. Wall, who had braids at the time, was initially reluctant, but came around at the urging of some of his friends.

"When I first cut my hair and all that and didn't get any tattoos, that was the main thing, having a clean image coming into this," said Wall, who admits that he has been tempted to get a tattoo to honor his late father on his chest. "That's what they want, to help you to be more marketable. And if you don't stay in the league a long time, it helps you get jobs after this."

Mourning, the ex-Georgetown star and NBA champion with the Miami Heat, congratulated the rookies on making it to the league but wanted them to understand that being a basketball player is "temporary" and told them that success wasn't guaranteed, using the example of former No. 2 overall pick Jay Williams, whose career was derailed when he was injured in a motorcycle accident after his rookie season with Chicago.

"As fast as you come in this league, this league will spit you out of here," Mourning said. "I knew there was a clock that started as soon as I came into the league."

The clock has started for Wall, who is taking it all in. "You can learn so much from them, from guys that was in this way before we probably was even born," Wall said. "Then, you have people that's going through it right now that can really help you. It means a lot."


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