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The bedroom closet

Thursday, September 23, 2010; PG09

Carita Parker's bedroom closet in Calvert County

87" h x 109" w x 21" d

The Challenge

Parker shares the master bedroom closet in her Lusby home with her boyfriend. Their clothing and shoes as well as Parker's purses are stored there. She would love to have a combination of shelving and hanging rods and would also like to keep everything off the floor. She's open to any ideas to organize the crowded space.

The Solution

Provided by California Closets, 2800 Dorr Ave., Suite A, Fairfax, 703-573-9300

http://www.californiaclosets.com

Price as shown: $1,816, including installation

More Ideas

· A telescoping valet rod extends 13 inches and is used to hold garment bags or dry cleaning or for setting out clothes for the next day.

· Shelving that is 24 inches wide can accommodate two side-by-side stacks of folded clothes.

· Shoe shelving, usually six inches high, can be adjusted in this closet to make more or less room as needed. Women's flats, for example, need less than six inches of shelf height.

· A pullout tie rack and a stationary belt rack are installed on the inside walls of the shelving.

· All shelving and rods are adjustable.

· Standard closet depth is 24 inches. That's how wide clothes are when they are hanging.

· Use drawers for storing personal items.

A double-hanging rod is the most inexpensive way to maximize small closet space. A double-hanging rod is an easy and inexpensive way to maximize space in a small closet. Just hook one onto an existing rod and it instantly expands the hanging space.

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