Corrections

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Wednesday, September 29, 2010

The Washington Post is committed to correcting errors that appear in the newspaper. Those interested in contacting the paper for that purpose can:

E-mail: corrections@washpost.com.

Call: 202-334-6000, and ask to be connected to the desk involved - National, Foreign, Metro, Style, Sports, Business or any of the weekly sections.

The ombudsman, who acts as the readers' representative, can be reached by calling 202-334-7582 or e-mailing ombudsman@washpost.com.

A Sept. 28 Health & Science article about deaf children's use of "cued speech," a system of hand signals to mimic sounds, incorrectly said that Grace Consacro teaches American Sign Language in addition to cued speech at Flower Valley Elementary School in Rockville. Consacro teaches cued speech at the school, which has a special track for students who use it; she does not teach or use ASL in the classroom.

A Nationals Journal item in the Sept. 26 Sports section, about third baseman Ryan Zimmerman's rib injury, incorrectly said that Zimmerman had an .899 slugging percentage. That was his on-base plus slugging percentage; his slugging percentage was .510.

A Sept. 25 A-section article on an upcoming independence referendum in Sudan incorrectly described the Darfur region as being in eastern Sudan. It is in western Sudan.

A Sept. 25 Economy & Business article about a dispute between Constellation Energy and its French partner incorrectly said that President Obama had visited Constellation's Calvert Cliffs nuclear power plant. George W. Bush visited the site as president, and Obama traveled to a different location in Maryland to discuss federal loan guarantees.

A graphic with a Sept. 25 Metro article about this summer's record-setting heat misstated the dates on which the temperature reached 102 degrees at Reagan National Airport. That was the high on July 6 and 7, not June 6 and 7.

A Sept. 15 Metro article about the primary elections for D.C. Council incorrectly said that Kwame R. Brown, 39, will be the council's youngest chairman if he is elected to the post in November. Arrington L. Dixon was 36 when he became council chairman in 1979.


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