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As life experiences of gay teens illustrate, the world is still far from accepting

Members of the Rutgers University community participate in a candlelight vigil for freshman Tyler Clementi, whose suicidal plan was disclosed on Facebook.
Members of the Rutgers University community participate in a candlelight vigil for freshman Tyler Clementi, whose suicidal plan was disclosed on Facebook. (Reena Rose Sibayan/associated Press)

Today, the average age that kids come out is 13, Barnett said.

Although they are more confident, emboldened and proud, they are coming out in a world that will still beat the crap out of them. That still condemns homosexuality with a fervor that can be frightening.

Just take a look at the Supreme Court's docket this week, where the Rev. Fred W. Phelps will insist that it's his right to devastate a mourning family with his hateful, horrid, anti-gay protests at soldiers' funerals.

And technology affords a handful of new fronts for bullies to harass and humiliate: Facebook wall posts can be seen by more eyes than any bathroom wall graffiti, and Twitter can outrun all playground gossip. Relentless texts and e-mails pound a young soul to a pulp as bullies hide behind anonymous e-mails and whittle away at any sense of safety.

It also appears that some of our nation's grown-ups have set a deplorable standard, without the help of a blog. The teens at SMYAL told me horrible things about the way they were treated by the adults who should be protecting them.

Cole still remembers being slapped across the face when she was 14 and told her family that she was gay. And she still remembers their shock a few years later when she announced that she is transgender and began taking female hormones.

Many LGBT kids get kicked out of their homes by their mom, dad, grandmother or auntie. They've been forced into Bible study for "reeducation" and humiliated in front of entire church congregations. They've dropped out of school because they get jumped every day.

None of the teens I talked with was all that surprised by the recent rash of gay youth suicides across the country.

I got a smirk, an eyebrow raised, a head-thrown-back laugh from them when I asked.

"Guuurl? You think it's easy for us out there?"

"I met one kid who was carrying a hammer in his backpack to school every day, just so he could defend himself," said Cortez Riley, 22, who can understand that kind of logic. He had it pretty rough growing up gay in Charles County.

He heard his teachers loudly gossip about other gay kids at school. His track coach would yell at the runners at practice: "Don't be lazy and fag out."

When Riley finally came out, his father stopped talking to him.

Being a gay grown-up is far easier, Riley told me. He's got a good job now, supportive friends and a future.

He's just worried that so many of the teens he knows won't make it that far.

E-mail me at dvorakp@washpost.com.


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