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Florida Governor's Race 2010: Alex Sink in tight contest with Rick Scott

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Washington Post Staff
Tuesday, October 12, 2010; 5:05 PM

State CFO Alex Sink is looking to take the seat vacated by Governor Charlie Crist, yet is opposed by Rick Scott, a wealthy businessman.

As WhoRunsGov explains:

After a 26-year career in the private sector, Alex Sink decided to enter the public sector, winning the position of Florida's chief financial officer in 2006.

At the height of Sink's long career in business, she ran all Florida operations for Bank of America. Nonetheless, until this race, she was not well-known in Florida. Her husband, Bill McBride, previously ran for the Florida governor's seat. Jeb Bush beat him in 2002

More from WhoRunsGov here

Running as a political outsider in a year that favors them, Rick Scott delivered one of the biggest surprises of the 2010 primary season when he defeated former Florida Congressman and state Attorney General Bill McCollum (R) for the Republican gubernatorial nomination in the Sunshine State.

He is also a controversial figure because as head of Columbia/HCA, the company was fined $1.7 billion after pleading guilty to overbilling the government. Scott was ousted in 1997 and settled in Naples, Fla., where he built a chain of walk-in clinics and jumped into the governor's race at the last minute in April 2010.

Read more about Rick Scott here

As the AP reported, the race is quickly heating up as November approaches:

Florida's Democratic candidate for governor, Alex Sink, said Monday she will begin airing a rare two-minute-long TV ad attacking Republican opponent Rick Scott for the massive fraud scandal that occurred on his watch at his former hospital company.

The commercial contains no new revelations, but a two-minute-long political ad is rare in Florida, where candidates typically relay their messages in 30-second spots.

"It takes more than a 30-second ad to detail my opponent's long record of unethical business practices and even fraud investigations and criminal investigations," Sink, the state's elected chief financial officer, said in a news conference.

Scott has said he didn't know about any wrongdoing and was never charged.

His campaign said in a statement that Sink and state Democrats are "repackaging old, tired attacks that failed to resonate with Floridians in the primary."

Read the rest of the story here

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