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Snapshots of a much-too-brief life

Evan Salter comforts his father, Ken, as the family comes to the decision to release Jacob, in the foreground, from machinery.
Evan Salter comforts his father, Ken, as the family comes to the decision to release Jacob, in the foreground, from machinery.

"Pictures as well as clothing, footprints, handprints, stuffed animals and blankets are tangible reminders to these families of the precious little life they have lost," said Ashley Ray, a nurse in Huntsville, Ala., who works with bereaved parents. "It is so awesome to be able to offer these families professional photos of their sweet babies."

For the photographers, it's a ministry, Pollard said.

"I had my son two months early, and he is still with us on this side of heaven," Pollard said. "He spent two months in the NICU. We were told he was not going to survive, but our son went home. Beside us, there was a family whose daughter didn't. I needed to do something to give back."

The photographs help make the lifetime of their daughter real, say Joey and Michelle Karr, who lost their daughter Janie Beth.

"The one time Janie Beth opened her eyes, Kelly happened to catch that on film. I never even noticed she was taking a picture," Joey Karr said.

But Bougher noticed the moment when the tiny face peered up at her father from his arms.

"It's like she looked right into his soul," Baugher said.

- Religion News Service


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