Documentary hails children with disabilities; article discusses yoga injury

The young people featured in HBO's documentary rise above their limitations to show that they can be achievers
The young people featured in HBO's documentary rise above their limitations to show that they can be achievers (Hbo)

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Monday, November 1, 2010; 4:13 PM

EDUCATION

'Disability' isn't in their dictionary "I Can't Do This but I Can Do That" (HBO)

This 30-minute documentary focuses on children with learning differences and shows how they cope. As the title suggests, the theme is that although these kids may struggle in some areas, they excel in others. Joey is a 12-year-old with an auditory processing disorder, which makes it hard for him to think and hear at the same time. But he can paint stunning wall murals of knights and dragons. Almost all of the stories end positively, with the child switching into programs for learning differences. (The upbeat film doesn't call them "disabilities.") Check www.hbo.com for air times.

Exercise

The downside of upside down Yoga Journal, November issue

Yoga teacher Patricia Sullivan shares a cautionary tale about an injury she sustained practicing "the king of the asanas [poses]": headstand. Numbness in her right hand turned to chronic pain, which a doctor confirmed was from her regimen of standing on her head for 10 minutes at a time. "My longing to excel . . . had led me to ignore my body's signals and cries for relief," she writes. Multiple sidebars to the article show safer ways to invert the body, such as lying with one's legs up the wall.

- Rachel Saslow


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