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Flood waning, Iceland volcano eruption less likely

FILE - In this Thursday Nov. 4, 2004 file photo a cloud of ash erupts from Grimsvotn, a lake in the middle of Vatnajokull, the biggest glacier in Iceland. Torrents of water are pouring from a glacier that sits atop Iceland's most active volcano, an indication that the mountain is growing hotter and may be about to erupt, scientists said Monday, Nov. 1, 2010. The flood that began Thursday at the Grimsvotn volcano is similar to one in 2004 that lasted five days and ended with an eruption that disrupted European air traffic, University of Iceland geophysicist Pall Einarsson said. (AP Photo/Pll Stefansson, File)
FILE - In this Thursday Nov. 4, 2004 file photo a cloud of ash erupts from Grimsvotn, a lake in the middle of Vatnajokull, the biggest glacier in Iceland. Torrents of water are pouring from a glacier that sits atop Iceland's most active volcano, an indication that the mountain is growing hotter and may be about to erupt, scientists said Monday, Nov. 1, 2010. The flood that began Thursday at the Grimsvotn volcano is similar to one in 2004 that lasted five days and ended with an eruption that disrupted European air traffic, University of Iceland geophysicist Pall Einarsson said. (AP Photo/Pll Stefansson, File) (Pll Stefansson - Associated Press)
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The Associated Press
Thursday, November 4, 2010; 10:24 AM

REYKJAVIK, Iceland -- Scientists say glacial flooding from Iceland's most active volcano has peaked, with no sign yet of an eruption.

Geophysicists have been monitoring the Grimsvotn volcano since melted glacial ice began pouring from it several days ago, signaling a possible eruption.

Icelandic Meteorological Office scientist Gunnar Gudmundsson said Thursday that floodwaters are receding, and tremors at the volcano are also decreasing.

He says it is now "less likely that we will get an eruption, at least in the near future."

Grimsvotn lies under the uninhabited Vatnajokull glacier in southeast Iceland.

It last erupted in 2004. Scientists say another eruption will likely be small and should not lead to the air travel chaos caused in April by ash from the Eyjafjallajokul volcano.


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