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Karzai aide blames British for bringing Taliban impostor to talks

An Afghan boy guides a donkey carrying his mother and brother in the Karokh district of Herat province. The country faces political uncertainty as officials probe allegations of fraud in this fall's elections.
An Afghan boy guides a donkey carrying his mother and brother in the Karokh district of Herat province. The country faces political uncertainty as officials probe allegations of fraud in this fall's elections. (Afp/getty Images)

Four election officials have been summoned for questioning on Saturday.

The crackdown on the election officials, along with harsh criticism from the attorney general's office of the legitimacy of the results announced this week, threatens a prolonged crisis.

Deputy Attorney General Rahmatullah Nazari said in an interview that the investigations will probably "come up with a result which will definitely question the legitimacy of the recent parliamentary elections."

The Independent Election Commission (IEC) announced final tallies for 33 of Afghanistan's provinces on Wednesday but said technical problems had prevented it from certifying the results in the eastern province of Ghazni.

Karzai's supporters fared poorly in the elections. His ethnic group, the Pashtuns, suffered particularly in Ghazni, a majority-Pashtun province, because the Taliban insurgency prevented many people from voting. The top 11 finishers there are from the Hazara minority.

Daudzai said that the attorney general "may have meant that his assessment, his investigation, may change the result."

If the legal system finds "serious wrongdoing" in Ghazni and other provinces, Daudzai said, "then the IEC will have no choice but to announce reelection there."

Staff writers Rajiv Chandrasekaran and Greg Miller in Washington contributed to this report.


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