Scientists unveil the squidworm, a newly discovered species

An undated handout photo released by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) showing a recently discovered species called a squidworm found in the Celebes sea in Southeast Asia. Scientists unveiled on November 24, 2010 a gossamer, ghostly creature discovered in the deepest reaches of the ocean between Indonesia and the Philippines. The squidworm, Teuthidodrilus samae, up to 9.4 centimetres (3.7 inches) in length, is far more elegant than its name would suggest. Swimming upright, it navigates by moving two body-length rows of thin, paddle-shaped protrusions that cascade like dominoes.
An undated handout photo released by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) showing a recently discovered species called a squidworm found in the Celebes sea in Southeast Asia. Scientists unveiled on November 24, 2010 a gossamer, ghostly creature discovered in the deepest reaches of the ocean between Indonesia and the Philippines. The squidworm, Teuthidodrilus samae, up to 9.4 centimetres (3.7 inches) in length, is far more elegant than its name would suggest. Swimming upright, it navigates by moving two body-length rows of thin, paddle-shaped protrusions that cascade like dominoes.
Monday, November 29, 2010; 6:07 PM

Scientists with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and the Scripps Institution of Oceanography last week published photographs and information of a newly discovered species found in the Celebes Sea between Indonesia and the Philippines: the squidworm. Pale, shimmering and more elegant than its name would imply, the palm-size creature swims upright, navigating by moving two body-length rows of thin, paddle-shaped protrusions. Teuthidodrilus samae was discovered in October 2007 by a remotely operated vehicle in the deepest reaches of the Celebes. In a paper published in the journal Biology Letters last week, the scientists said the squidworm could represent a transitional species between those that live in the mud on the deep-sea floor and those that live entirely in the water.


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