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WikiLeaks opens the floodgates for critics of the Obama administration

The U.S. diplomatic cables released by WikiLeaks offer unvarnished insights into the personal proclivities of world leaders.

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By Al Kamen
Washington Post Staff Writer
Tuesday, November 30, 2010; 10:51 PM

The WikiLeaks uproar has folks jumping all over President Obama's administration for a variety of alleged sins of omission and commission.

Sarah Palin weighed in big time on Facebook, blasting the administration for "incompetently handling the whole fiasco" and for not going after WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange with greater urgency.

She tweeted that the administration might have gone to court to stop the disclosures. "Inexplicable: I recently won in court to stop my book 'America by Heart' from being leaked," she wrote, "but US Govt can't stop Wikileaks' treasonous act?"

Probably not. We're told there's a big legal difference between copyright law and First Amendment law. Also, while Assange might be charged, there was this Supreme Court case a long time ago, something about publishing the Pentagon Papers . . .

Meanwhile, relying on a newspaper account - some of the actual cables have not been made public - Military Families United excoriated the administration for using "taxpayer money . . . to pay off foreign governments to accept these dangerous security risks," namely prisoners from Guantanamo Bay.

The New York Times had reported that "the island nation of Kiribati," an archipelago way out in the Pacific and one of the poorest nations on Earth, with a population of about 100,000, "was offered incentives worth million of dollars to take in Chinese Muslim detainees."

But the Obama folks pleaded not guilty Monday. The millions of dollars were offered by the George W. Bush administration to Kiribati, an Obama administration official said, adding that the current administration never pursued negotiations with the island nation over Guantanamo detainees and that none were ever sent there.

The Times clarified Tuesday that it was the Bush administration that tried to pay off the islanders.

(D) is for December . . .

The Democrats have gotten into the swing of the holiday season, doing their best Monday to boost consumer spending via the Internet.

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee's online store offered a "Cyber Monday Sale" offering shoppers a "buy one item, get one 50% off" discount. Such a deal! Let's see what they have that might be good for those remaining Democrats in your family.

Well, there's a "Proud Democrat" travel mug for $9.99 for always-proud cousin Bobby, who's been on a bender for so long he probably hasn't heard of last month's Great Shellacking.

There's a "Democratic Dog" leash (only $6.99), which House Republicans might want to deploy on the House floor in January. (It's just $3.50 if this is your second item, and it's genuine natural nylon.)


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