» This Story:Read +|Watch +| Comments

The Breaking News Blog

All the latest news from the District, Maryland and Virginia

D.C. nightclub set to reopen after man's death

Network News

X Profile
View More Activity
By Paul Duggan
Washington Post Staff Writer
Wednesday, December 1, 2010; 10:40 PM

A D.C. licensing board voted Wednesday to allow the reopening of DC9, a nightclub ordered closed by police after a man died in an incident involving four employees and a co-owner of the bar.

This Story
View All Items in This Story
View Only Top Items in This Story

The popular club, in the 1900 block of Ninth Street NW, was shut down by D.C. Police Chief Cathy L. Lanier after the death Oct. 15 of Ali Ahmed Mohammed, who was chased by the five men after he threw at least one brick through the club's front window, officers said. They said Mohammed, 27, of Silver Spring, died during an encounter with the men on the street.

On Wednesday, the seven-member governing board of the city's Alcoholic Beverage Regulation Administration voted unanimously to allow the club to reopen Dec. 15 under several conditions, said Cynthia Simms, the board's spokeswoman. She said the decision will be reviewed at a hearing Jan. 19.

The five men - including then-co-owner William Spieler, who has disassociated himself from the club - initially were charged with second-degree murder in what Lanier called a "savage" case of "vigilante justice." Authorities later dismissed the charges because the cause and manner of Mohammed's death had not been determined by the D.C. medical examiner's office.

Among other conditions of DC9's reopening, the club will not be allowed to employ Spieler or any of the four other men, Simms said. She said the board's ruling could be reversed or altered at the January hearing if more information about Mohammed's death becomes available.

Police and the medical examiner's office are investigating the incident and Mohammed's medical condition and injuries, authorities said. They said they would not be legally barred from refiling criminal charges in the case if new information warrants such a move.


» This Story:Read +|Watch +| Comments

More in the D.C. Section

Fixing D.C. Schools

Fixing D.C. Schools

The Washington Post investigates the state of the schools and the lessons of failed and successful reforms.

Neighborhoods

Neighborhoods

Use Neighborhoods to learn about Washington, D.C., Maryland and Virginia communities.

Top High Schools

Top High Schools

Jay Mathews identifies the nation's most challenging high schools and explains why they're best.

FOLLOW METRO ON:
Facebook Twitter RSS
|
GET LOCAL ALERTS:
© 2010 The Washington Post Company

Network News

X My Profile