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The Crime Scene: Defense can't review Love medical records

By Matt Zapotosky
Wednesday, December 22, 2010; 1:36 PM

A Charlottesville General District Court judge ruled Wednesday that defense attorneys cannot review years of medical records for the University of Virginia lacrosse player slain in May, saying there was nothing unusual or relevant to the case in the documents.

In a hearing that lasted about five minutes, Judge Robert H. Downer Jr said that defense attorneys for George Huguely V, accused of slaying his on again, off again girlfriend Yeardley Love, could look at Love's Adderall prescription -- which was already public knowledge -- but nothing else in her medical records. He said those records showed Love hadn't taken any prescription drugs she was not prescribed, had no unusual problems with dieting and were generally not relevant to the case.

Defense attorneys had sought the records in an attempt to show Love died from a cardiac arrhythmia causing insufficient blood flow to the head, rather than blunt force trauma inflicted by Huguely. Their own expert testified in an earlier hearing that his working hypothesis was Love's vascular system suffered from a lack of oxygen, which caused ongoing damage and contributed to her death.

A state medical examiner had ruled blunt force trauma to the head killed Love.

Commenting on the records he had reviewed, Downer said there was nothing "remotely embarrassing or unusual for a woman who is a student athlete."

Huguely remains jailed until a preliminary hearing in January.

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