washingtonpost.com
Elaine O'Neal's daily portraits of her daughter

Friday, February 4, 2011; T18

THE STORY BEHIND THE WORK

When Elaine O'Neil's daughter, Julia Hess, was almost 11, she agreed to be photographed with her mother every day for one year. The informal daily portraits actually continued for more than four years, yielding 1,500 exposures.

It was an art project, of course, but also a maternal one. O'Neil recalls she was reading books about adolescence, which said that "girls' self-confidence had to do with their relationships with their mothers." Also, she was working long hours, and "wanted to have the connection we had had previously."

O'Neil originally intended to exhibit all the photographs, but now says that "half of them I would never show. It became clear that some were simply better photographs." ("Close to Home" includes 10; see more at www.motherdaughterbook.com .)

The daily ritual ended as Hess's 16th birthday approached. (She's now 28.) "It was an appropriate time to stop," O'Neil says. "At 16, she was very much more interested in the outside world than in the home."

- Mark Jenkins

Post a Comment


Comments that include profanity or personal attacks or other inappropriate comments or material will be removed from the site. Additionally, entries that are unsigned or contain "signatures" by someone other than the actual author will be removed. Finally, we will take steps to block users who violate any of our posting standards, terms of use or privacy policies or any other policies governing this site. Please review the full rules governing commentaries and discussions. You are fully responsible for the content that you post.

© 2011 The Washington Post Company