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Israeli-Arab leaders under fire for Libya visit

In this April 25, 2010 photo made available by the Al Arab news website Wednesday, March 2, 2011, Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi, center left, stands with Israeli Arab lawmaker Ahmad Tibi, center right, in Serte, Libya. Israeli-Arab leaders are on the defensive over a much-publicized visit to Libya last year, where they fawned over Moammar Gadhafi and posed for a series of photographs beaming alongside the iron-fisted ruler. (AP Photo/Al-Arab, HO) NO SALES
In this April 25, 2010 photo made available by the Al Arab news website Wednesday, March 2, 2011, Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi, center left, stands with Israeli Arab lawmaker Ahmad Tibi, center right, in Serte, Libya. Israeli-Arab leaders are on the defensive over a much-publicized visit to Libya last year, where they fawned over Moammar Gadhafi and posed for a series of photographs beaming alongside the iron-fisted ruler. (AP Photo/Al-Arab, HO) NO SALES (AP)

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By DIAA HADID
The Associated Press
Friday, March 4, 2011; 3:46 AM

JERUSALEM -- Israeli-Arab leaders are on the defensive over a much-publicized visit to Libya last year, where they fawned over Moammar Gadhafi and posed for a series of photographs beaming alongside the longtime ruler.

Known as loud critics of Israel's treatment of its Arab minority, they are now facing uncomfortable questions about their long history of cozying up to some of the Middle East's most authoritarian leaders.

"I cannot stop myself from feeling shame that assaults me every time I see my photographs with him," Hanin Zoabi, an Arab Israeli lawmaker who met Gadhafi, wrote in a local website.

Zoabi, like other members of the delegation, refused to apologize for last April's visit, saying it was necessary for Israeli Arabs to reach out to Mideast leaders and naive and impossible to ignore them.

The uproar has drawn attention to the state of Israel's Arabs, who account for about a fifth of the country's population of 7.6 million.

While Israeli Arabs are citizens with full voting rights, in contrast to their Palestinian brethren in the neighboring West Bank and Gaza Strip, they frequently suffer discrimination - in employment, education, municipal budgets and land allocation.

Many of Israel's Arabs openly identify with the Arab world, with lawmakers and civic figures frequently traveling to meet leaders in Arab nations hostile to the Jewish state.

In one extreme case, former lawmaker Azmi Bishara came under heavy criticism for visiting Syria and meeting President Bashar Assad and officials from the Lebanese guerrilla group Hezbollah. Assad is a bitter foe of Israel, who provides aid to Hezbollah and the Hamas militant group.

Bishara later fled the country after he was accused of spying for Hezbollah, which battled Israel to a stalemate in a month-long war in 2006. Living in exile, Bishara is now a popular pundit on Arabic language channel Al-Jazeera, where he urges Arab demonstrators to overthrow their regimes.

Among Arabs here, Bishara is still widely seen as a hero for confronting Israel. But the new photos of other Arab leaders - including religious officials and lawmakers - praising Gadhafi seem to be too much for their public to bear.

The photographs show delegation members posing beside Gadhafi, who wears black sunglasses, a turban, shiny brown pants and a shirt concealed by a darker brown wrap. The photographs, published on different Arab-Israeli websites, suggest some representatives took turns standing next to the Libyan leader.

Ahmed Tibi, a prominent Arab lawmaker, called Gadhafi "the leader of the Arab leaders, king of the Arab kings," according to an official transcript published on a Libyan government news website.


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