HK's Cathay adds 27 Boeing, Airbus jets to fleet

Network News

X Profile
View More Activity
By KELVIN CHAN
The Associated Press
Wednesday, March 9, 2011; 6:29 AM

HONG KONG -- Cathay Pacific Airways is ordering 27 new Airbus and Boeing jets to expand services after profit tripled last year to a record.

Hong Kong's biggest airline said Wednesday it signed a deal with Airbus SAS for 15 A330-300 airplanes and another with Boeing Co. for 10 777-300ER jets. Cathay has also agreed to lease two Airbus A350-900s from International Lease Finance Corp. - adding this jet to its fleet for the first time.

The airline said the 27 jets are worth 51 billion Hong Kong dollars ($6.5 billion) at sticker prices but it's getting a big discount, a common practice in such deals.

The new jets will allow Cathay to continue expanding its passenger routes as well as help the airline save on fuel, its biggest cost, by retiring older, thirstier jets.

Cathay's Airbus A330-300s are primarily used on routes to Australia, India and other countries in Asia while its Boeing 777-300ER jets are mainly used on long-haul routes. All will be delivered by the end of 2015.

The announcement follows the airline's biggest ever order announced in September, for 36 aircraft, including 30 from Airbus and six from Boeing.

The airline is in talks to buy 14 more aircraft, but did not give any more details.

Cathay also said that full-year profit for 2010 tripled to a record 14.05 billion Hong Kong dollars ($1.8 billion) from 4.69 billion Hong Kong dollars in 2009.

The airline credited a recovery that began in late 2009 for helping its passenger and cargo businesses to bounce back strongly from the global recession.

Chairman Christopher Pratt said the result "represents a truly remarkable recovery from our low point in 2008" during the depths of the financial crisis.

The airline has been adding new routes, increasing flights to existing destinations and plans to hire 2,300 new staff this year, including 1,300 cabin crew and 250 pilots.

But Pratt warned that profits could be hit if fuel costs don't come down.


CONTINUED     1        >

© 2011 The Associated Press

Network News

X My Profile