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Emergency personnel investigate the scene of a bus crash on Interstate 95 in New York City on Saturday. Fourteen people died when the bus flipped onto its side and was sliced in half by a sign's support pole.
Emergency personnel investigate the scene of a bus crash on Interstate 95 in New York City on Saturday. Fourteen people died when the bus flipped onto its side and was sliced in half by a sign's support pole. (David Karp)
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Sunday, March 13, 2011

New York

Tour bus crash on I-95 leaves 14 dead

Fourteen people were killed Saturday when a tour bus returning from a casino at daybreak scraped along a guard rail on Interstate 95, tipped on its side and slammed into a pole that sheared it nearly end to end.

The bus had just reached the outskirts of New York City on a journey from the Mohegan Sun casino in Connecticut when the crash happened. The driver told police he lost control trying to avoid a swerving tractor-trailer.

The bus scraped along the guard rail for 300 feet, toppled and crashed into the support pole for a highway sign indicating the exit for the Hutchinson Parkway. The pole knifed through the bus front to back along the window line, peeling the roof off all the way to the back tires. Most of the 31 passengers were hurled to the front of the bus on impact, fire chief Edward Kilduff said.

New York Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly said police were still looking for the truck, which did not stop after the crash.

Kelly said both the bus and the rig were both moving at "a significant rate of speed."

Limo driver Homer Martinez happened on the scene moments after the wreck and saw other drivers sprinting from their cars to assist the injured.

"People were saying, 'Oh my God. Oh my God,' holding their hands on their heads," Martinez said. "I saw people telling other people not to go there, 'You don't want to see this.' "

- Associated Press

North Dakota

Hundreds of drivers stranded in storm

About 800 people were rescued from vehicles after being stranded on ice-slicked roads and in drifting snow when a blizzard created white-out conditions, the North Dakota Highway Patrol said Saturday.

A series of pileups and crashes left only minor injuries. Drivers abandoned more than 500 cars.

The town of Medina has seen its population of 335 double with 400 stranded drivers who were brought to a church and school there.

North Dakota National Guard spokesman Capt. Dan Murphy says 70 soldiers used military trucks that could plow through huge snow drifts to collect scores of stranded drivers and take them "to any warm building that was available." He says the rescue effort has ended but soldiers remain on duty, patrolling highway entrances.


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