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Nuclear Proliferation

U.S. Produces the Atomic Bomb

U.S. Produces the Atomic Bomb
This broadcast from Aug. 9, 1945, describes the world's most destructive weapon, produced by U.S. scientists in collaboration with European savants. As Japanese port cities Hiroshima and Nagasaki feel the full destructive force of the lethal weapon, some of the startling details of its production are revealed. Source: The National Archives

Atomic Bomb Levels Hiroshima

Atomic Bomb Levels Hiroshima
This Sept. 10, 1945, broadcast shows the destruction of the Japanese city Hiroshima after becoming the first target of an atomic bomb. The single bomb, equal to 20,000 tons of T.N.T. in explosive power, levelled 70 percent of the city, killed 126,000 and left acres of empty wastelands in the heart of a once thriving city. Source: The National Archives

Atomic Blast in the Desert

Atomic Blast in the Desert
In a Sept. 13, 1945, broadcast, Maj. General L.R. Groves, development director, and Dr. J.R. Oppenheimer, collaborating scientist, lead a survey group into an area of New Mexico that was the site of a test explosion of America's super-mystery weapon -- the Atomic Bomb. Source: The National Archives

Atomist Says West Can Stop Red Tide

Atomist Says West Can Stop Red Tide
Dr. Harold Urey, one of the foremost atomic bomb scientists says in this Dec. 15, 1949, broadcast that only firmness and the Western Union can halt Red aggression. Source: The National Archives

Atoms-for-Peace Parley Opens

Atoms-for-Peace Parley Opens
This Oct. 3, 1957, broadcast shows 60 nations taking part in the first meeting of the International Atomic Energy Agency, in Vienna, bringing one step closer to fruition President Eisenhower's proposal for a U.N.-sponsored atoms-for-peace program. Source: The National Archives

New Atom Tests

New Atom Tests
As dawn breaks over Las Vegas, the 1957 atomic test series begins, as shown in this May 30, 1957, report. The familiar "mushroom cloud" rises up as new warnings are heard telling of the dangers of Strontium-90 fallout endangering the safety of the world's populace. Source: The National Archives

NATO Nears Nuclear Agreement

NATO Nears Nuclear Agreement
The meeting of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization in Paris, shown in this Dec. 17, 1964, report, has Secretary of State Dean Rusk and Defense Secretary Robert McNamara presenting the United States case for a unified front with a joint nuclear force -- something France opposes. They also confirmed that nuclear demolition bombs have been planted along the East border. Source: The National Archives

Scores of Nations Join in Atom Ban

Scores of Nations Join in Atom Ban
Nations join the Big Three in signing an atom-test ban agreement in this Aug. 8, 1963, report. The Kremlin is the setting for the historic event as the United States, Britain and the USSR agree to ban all except underground nuclear testing. Dean Rusk signs for the U.S., Andrei Gromyko for the Soviets and Lord Home for Britain as Kruschev looks on with U.N. Secretary General U. Thant. Source: The National Archives

East-West Reach Historic Agreement

East-West Reach Historic Agreement
In this July 25, 1963, broadcast, an atom test ban agreement has been initialed in Moscow, a historic milestone that acknowledges that man's future rests in his own hands. After 10 days of negotiations, Gromyko, Harriman and Hailsham accept the agreement for their governments. Now each country must ratify the pact. Source: The National Archives

Test Ban Treaty Becomes Official

Test Ban Treaty Becomes Official
In this Oct. 7, 1963, broadcast, the limited nuclear test ban treaty becomes official in the White House Treaty Room - the same room where the peace protocol was signed to end the Spanish-American War. In the presence of official witnesses and Congressional leaders, the president hails the agreement with Russia with a note of caution, calling it the first fruit of hope. Source: The National Archives


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