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Jonathan Weisman
Washington Post Congressional Reporter
Friday, January 19, 2007; 11:00 AM

Don't want to miss out on the latest in politics? Start each day with The Post Politics Hour. Join in each weekday morning at 11 a.m. as a member of The Washington Post's team of White House and Congressional reporters answers questions about the latest in buzz in Washington and The Post's coverage of political news.

Washington Post Congressional reporter Jonathan Weisman was online Friday, Jan. 19, at 11 a.m. ET to discuss the latest political news and The Post's coverage of politics.

Political analysis from Post reporters and interviews with top newsmakers. Listen live on Washington Post Radio or subscribe to a podcast of the show.

The transcript follows.

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Jonathan Weisman: Wow, for a short, four-day week, it sure was busy -- ethics in the Senate, Lord-knows-what in the House, Nancy Pelosi, John Dingell, global warming.

So on with your questions on Lindsay Lohan's rehab.

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San Francisco: Hello, Jonathan, thanks for chatting with us today and for selecting my question, which is: What don't Senate Democratic leaders get about ethics reform? Do they not understand that they were given the majority to clean up the mess in Washington? Lost in the mists of time (and the controversies over the President's surge plan) is that most voters in November cited corruption as their reason for voting. And at least to me, little is more corrupt than Congressional spouses lobbying their spouses' colleagues in Congress! Why doesn't Harry Reid understand he shouldn't be playing defense on ethics?

washingtonpost.com: Senate Passes Ethics Package (Post, Jan. 19)

Jonathan Weisman: Um, not sure what you're on about, San Francisco. The Senate passed an ethics package last night that was considerably stronger than the simple rules changes passed by the House. True, they rejected the independent outside ethics office, but even promoters of the Office of Public Integrity said it would take a lot more time to build up support for that. Overall, I think a 96-2 vote shows an ear for ethics issues.

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Colorado: With Hagel and Snowe officially signed on as co-sponsors of the Biden resolution, and with Norm Coleman apparently having been called back to heel by Karl Rove, do you have some idea/information about how many GOP senators will vote for the resolution? Any names?

Jonathan Weisman: I'm not so sure Norm Coleman is at Rove's heels. There's a group of about six Republicans that are being fought over. They have expressed doubts or outright opposition to the "surge" but have not signed on to an actual vote against it. Coleman is at the top, followed by Susan Collins, George Voinovich, Lisa Murkowski, Richard Lugar, Sam Brownback and Arlen Specter. John Warner is trying to find a middle ground between support and outright opposition. Watch them in the coming days.

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Richmond, Va.: It is quite wonderful to see the energy in the House this past week as it passed a number of bills addressing fundamental issues that have been off the table these past six years, but -- and this might sound cynical -- don't most of these bills just die a slow death (or become watered-down) in the Senate? That makes it is easy for some Congressmen to vote on a bill that makes them look good to some of their constituents, while at the same time they can know that in the end their other constituents won't ever take the hit.

Jonathan Weisman: Some of them will die in the Senate, others in the White House. I would bet there will be an increase in the minimum wage, and some of the measures to enact more of the 9-11 Commission recommendations will pass. Ted Kennedy will push a student loan interest rate cut that actually may be stronger and broader than the House's version. But I'd bet the bill mandating the government negotiate prescription drug prices for Medicare does not get out of the Senate. 100 percent screening of cargo heading to the U.S. will reach the White House riddled with loopholes, and stem cell research will be vetoed. I'd also bet that any rollback in oil tax subsidies or mandated back payments on royalties will be enacted in a severely curtailed version.

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New York: I remember that sometime in the past year or so Republicans in the House forced a vote on support for the war in Iraq, basically to get the Democrats on-the-record prior to an upcoming election. Now that Democrats are pushing for the same type of resolutions, we hear cries of a "waste of time" and "playing politics." Do Republicans even know the meaning of the word "hypocrisy?"

Jonathan Weisman: Hey, they're also taking to the House floor day after day, saying they are being mistreated by the Democrats for doing what they did to the minority just a few weeks ago. And they actually complained that the student loan bill the other day didn't go far enough, neglecting to mention they didn't bother to do even that when they controlled the place.

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Arlington, VA: Can you explain why John Edwards' real estate transaction warrants front page coverage today? I read the article a couple of times, and frankly, I'm at a loss trying to decipher what John and Elizabeth Edwards did wrong. Now, if the buyers used part of proceeds from the questionable stock sale to buy the house, that's the buyers' problem, not the seller. And considering the Edwardses sold the house for less than what they were asking, I ask again: what did they do wrong?

Jonathan Weisman: Umm, this is, for obvious reasons, a sensitive question. I for one was looking for more of a connection between the Edwards and the buyers. I didn't see it. Frankly, I bought a house from some people named Buckmaster DeWolf and Rosemary Ratcliffe. I love their names but I met them for about 15 minutes as we signed our papers. So what?

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Rome, N.Y.: Which investigations do you think will get under way first? Is fear of Congressional airing of the issues partly behind the administrations's decision to use FISA warrants again?

Jonathan Weisman: First up will be an investigation of fraud and corruption in the rebuilding of Iraq and New Orleans. They are being extremely cautious on the NSA wiretapping and Guantanamo issues, but ultimately, John Conyers will need something to do.

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Silver Spring, Md.: Isn't it very unlikely that Democrats will tangle with funding, given the facts (a) it's political suicide, and (b) they have insufficient red state/red district support for it?

Jonathan Weisman: In some ways, the president handed the Democrats a political gift with his troop surge. If they can figure out how to do it, they can cut off funds for the additional troops without touching the troops already there. Momentum is gaining for some action like that. But let me add one caveat: By the time they figure out how to do it, many if not most of the troops will already be there.

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Sewickley, Pa.: When are the really juicy hearings going to start? I thought the Democrats were going to do oversight on war profiteering, intelligence skewing, war planning, etc. When will the subpoenas fly?

Jonathan Weisman: Two weeks from now, Henry Waxman's committee swings into gear, hauling up Jerry Bremer to talk about waste and fraud in Iraq.

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Washington: Glad to see that the White House Correspondent's Dinner is taking a bold move and booking Rich Little for their dinner! And he has been warned not to tell jokes about Bush. Huh? If the White House correspondents want everyday Americans to think that they are on top of things, that they "get it" that this president is a total and complete failure, then they need to bring back both Stephen Colbert and Lewis Black. But no, they pick some has-been who will do imitations of Nixon, Jimmy Carter, and Johnny Carson. Further proof that the press is not doing its job.

Jonathan Weisman: Oh please, it's a party. If you want to criticize, critique what you see (or don't see) in the newspaper or on television news, not what reporters do in their free time.

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Cincinnati: Howard Kurtz notes today that President Bush has cut back on its eavesdropping policy and is being severely chastised by pundits and bloggers for this reduction in authority. Isn't that what these folks wanted in the first place? Or is he always going to be cornered into no-win situations?

washingtonpost.com: Vindication for The Times? (Post, Jan. 19)

Jonathan Weisman: Well, we're not quite clear on what he has done to the program. One lawmaker, Jane Harman, said each individual target of eavesdropping will have to be subject to a warrant. But another, Heather Wilson, said it may be just a blanket warrant on whole groups of people. Until the administration clarifies that, questions need to be asked.

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St. Paul: Hi Jonathan. Back to an earlier question -- how long can the undecided Republicans wait? Can they sit until we see what happens with the "surge," or do they have to take a risk and not support it and hope it doesn't succeed? Also, as a Minnesotan who has watched Coleman's career for a long time, he's going to do everything he can to see which way the wind is blowing before he commits.

Jonathan Weisman: The resolution of opposition goes to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on Wednesday and will likely come to a debate and vote the following week. They don't have long before they have to cast their ballots.

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Pittsburgh: At Bush's upcoming State of the Union speech, do you think there will be actual booing? Or embarrassing silences? Or do you suppose the audience will clap and cheer as if nothing were wrong?

Jonathan Weisman: No, I think the Democrats will be on their best behavior. They won't clap uproariously but they will be polite. It's easy when you win.

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Syracuse, N.Y.: I recognize the need for bipartisanship and compromise in the Senate vs. the House, and I'm not asking for your personal opinion of course, but rather your sense of what your peers in the Congressional press corps are thinking. Which Democratic Senators could be doing a better job as Majority Leader than Harry Reid?

Jonathan Weisman: Jeez, he just got there. I think we can't judge his success or failure based on one piece of legislation -- and it did pass, 96-2.

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Washington: So what are the chances of the Senate filibustering the Biden-Levin-Hagel bill?

Jonathan Weisman: McConnell has issued that threat, but frankly, I think he won't do it. They almost filibustered the ethics bill. If they try to derail the Iraq resolution, they would be taking a stand on successive issues that drove the November election.

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Marin County, Calif.: Good Morning JW. What recourse would the recently fired U.S. Attorneys have in order to get their jobs back, and prove Gonzales is all about Bush/Cheney get-backs?

Jonathan Weisman: I think their best recourse is the public pressure that lawmakers are trying to apply. But ultimately, their employment is contingent on their boss, Alberto Gonzalez, and I don't see him reversing a personnel decision.

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Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India: I think Jon Stewart answered the wiretapping question: Bush doesn't mind letting the courts have oversight now because every phone in America already has been tapped!

Jonathan Weisman: Hey India, don't sell yourself short! International calls are the real target.

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Fremont, Calif.: A friend of mine came up with a suggestion the other day: Instead of cutting off funding of troops or more troops, cut off funding for the Pentagon's pet projects until Iraq is finished. No more multibillion dollar new weapon systems, aircraft carriers and the like until the need for all this 'emergency' spending is done. Once the gravy boat is stopped up, that should get some quick movement on getting out of there.

Jonathan Weisman: Ah, you are very smart. I talked to a senior appropriations committee aide who suggested the same thing. President Bush may get all the money he wants, but Democrats could make him wish he didn't.

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Going back on Active Duty: Our little military family is wondering about the "appeal for redress" filed by 1,000 members of the military. Have you seen any reaction in Congress? What will the legislators do with this petition?

Jonathan Weisman: Yesterday, nine anti-war Iraq vets were canvassing the Senate. Dennis Kucinich has the appeals for redress. So far, I haven't seen much of an impact, but if the numbers grow and some of these service members are called to publicly testify in committee (a la John Kerry), that might change.

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Washington: Syracuse asked about how Reid is doing as majority leader. I understand Trent Lott was more willing to express his opinions last night when he said something to the effect of "we are not bats, we do not work best at night." It sounds like some of these guys are unhappy with the extended work days.

Jonathan Weisman: Nothing has changed. This is exactly how things operated under Lott and under Frist.

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Cary, Ill.: Who decides what issue to investigate? Do the committee chairs have to get "permission" from the leadership? Does the leadership tell the committees what they will investigate? How does all that work?

Jonathan Weisman: The committee chairmen have some latitude, but Nancy Pelosi is coordinating with them. She wants to make sure there's no overlap and that the investigations don't come in a sudden rush and drown each other up. She also wants to keep John Dingell, a force of nature when Democrats had the majority 12 years ago, under wraps and make sure John Conyers doesn't go too far and alienate her conservatives.

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Anonymous: You really don't think that Rich Little being asked not to pick on the President says something about Washington and the political-media Establishment? Also, what did you think of Colbert's performance, personally? I thought it was hilarious but will stipulate that his critiques applied more to the electronic media (cable TV) than print. I think the gulf between print and TV coverage, in terms of depth and quality, is one of the great undiscussed aspects of contemporary politics.

Jonathan Weisman: I was there for Colbert's performance. I found it uncomfortable and not all that funny, but I understand why partisans loved seeing him take it to the president face to face. I'm sure Rich Little does show a reaction to last year's performance. I just don't attach much significance to one night a year.

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Sea of Tranquility, Moon: What's the buzz about Al Franken's potential Senate run? Is he considered a serious candidate (i.e., can he raise money from party loyalists)?

Jonathan Weisman: Hey moon man, I think he is serious, especially in a state that elected Jesse Ventura.

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Re: Bipartisanship: Since some of the past election was a commentary on how disgusted most people were with the out-and-out hostility between the two parties, have you had a sense that there might be some better coming-together in this new Congress, or will the early start of the presidential campaign ensure that each party stakes out its claim separately?

Jonathan Weisman: I think the Senate is trying, but so far, the House is really just paying lip service to it. Now that the 100 hours blitz is over, we'll see whether Nancy Pelosi makes good on her promises of comity.

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Washington: What is the thinking in the Bush administration regarding the long-term prognosis for all their efforts to expand executive power? Many of these efforts will be rolled back at some point, as we already see. Do they really think that they can make permanent changes, or is it also an effort to create an electoral issue (i.e., by being able to say that Republicans are tougher on security, etc. than Democrats)? At this point, such homogeneous thinking seems to cut against Republicans.

Jonathan Weisman: I don't think they really believe many of their efforts will outlive the Bush presidency, but they do hope they have strengthened executive backbone, regardless of the successor. What's remarkable is watching the Republicans. They also seem liberated by the minority status to really speak out. The atmosphere in the Capitol has changed.

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Roseland, N.J.: Quite a coincidence the Fed chairman discovers there's a huge, terrible deficit problem just when the Republicans lose power. A shame he and his predecessor couldn't find their microphones for the past six years...

washingtonpost.com: Bernanke Renews Debt Warning (Post, Jan. 19)

Jonathan Weisman: Now come on. Ben Bernanke has been saying this for a long time, as did Alan Greenspan. I saw nothing new in his pronouncement, save perhaps an amplification of the language.

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Philadelphia: What is the current status of the proposal to require Senate candidates to file their FEC reports electronically, the same way everyone else already does?

Jonathan Weisman: It passed last night.

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Out here: A lot of your fellow reporters and editors have moved on. Whom do you miss the most? (Don't suppose you'd tell us who you miss least but we'd like to know.) Also, do you think a Web site devoted to politics will give the WP a run for its money?

Jonathan Weisman: Hey Out Here, I used to work on the Financial Desk, and I really miss our Fed reporter extraordinaire, John Berry, and our great international economics writer, Paul Blustein. I think they were a real loss to the paper.

Frankly, I may live to regret this, but I really don't fear the Politico. I think the denizens of the web like political news slanted to their political bent. If they want straight stories, I think they will naturally stick with names they know, the Washington Post, the New York Times, etc.

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Claverack, N.Y.: Of the freshman Congressmen (no senators please), is there anyone in particular that's making a good first impression? Anyone strike you as having a potentially bright future?

Jonathan Weisman: Paul Hodes is the head of the freshman class and comes across as smart and serious. Walz from Minnesota is popular with his colleagues, as if Chris Murphy from Connecticut.

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Hastings, N.Y.: What makes you so sure that internationals calls are the target of Bush's surveillance program?

Jonathan Weisman: The stated targets were calls from international locations to the United States.

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Cheap Shot: Yeah, Minnesota elected a wrestler. We're sorry. It was a terrible election with two horrible major party candidates and we thought a third party might be worth a shot. We were wrong, he's gone now, forgive us and move on.

Jonathan Weisman: Hey Cheap Shot, my wife's entire family is in the Twin Cities area. We love you.

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Washington: Have you been surprised at the number of GOP votes for the Democrats' 100 hours legislation? We used to hear that the Dems couldn't keep their caucus together but the number of GOP defections on these bills seems extraordinarily large to me.

Jonathan Weisman: We led the paper Sunday with my surprise. What's really striking are the Republican votes against GOP leadership parliamentary votes. That was considered absolute heresy when Tom DeLay was around. Now, even past members of the leadership like Deborah Pryce are crossing that line.

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Minneapolis: Franken, since returning to Minnesota, has engaged in the hard work of reaching out to the grassroots of the party -- raising money for candidates across the Midwest. If he decides to run, his appeal won't solely be based on celebrity.

Jonathan Weisman: OK, Minneapolis. I trust you on that. He's Al Franken and I'm not.

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Calgary, AB, Canada: The big news is Canada today is Sen. Leahy taking Gonzales to task for refusing to divulge what if any evidence Homeland Security had to render Canadian Maher Arar to Syria where he was tortured and then keep his name on the no-fly list. Leahy went further (as he should have done) to ask Gonzales to provide some legal foundation for shipping foreign citizens to third-party countries known to torture, rather than to their states of citizenship. There is very little coverage of that aspect of the Judiciary Committee hearing in the Washington Post and other U.S. newspapers of record. Does that surprise you as it does me, especially considering that Gonzales initially held to the administration's usual refusal to discuss controversial (and so far, secret) security decisions, but then recanted when the Senator pressed harder?

Jonathan Weisman: We ran an epic, gripping and really shocking story on the Arar case. Forgive us for not giving it more attention, but the domestic wiretapping issue is just a lot hotter this side of the border.

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Iowa: We are used to an abundance of political commercials here, but I was surprised to see one this morning that was highly critical of John McCain, ending with "McCain's escalation -- from bad to worse." Trying to decide if the audience really is caucus-goers a year from now?

Jonathan Weisman: John McCain has to be in big trouble in Iowa, no?

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Minnesota: Hey, Sea of Tranquility, Al Franken will not be taken seriously even here. PS we're only liberal in U.S. Presidential elections. We haven't had either 2 Dem senators or a Dem governor in a loooooooong time. Jonathan Weisman, love your chats -- just the right amount of humor and seriousness.

Jonathan Weisman: Boy, lots of traffic from the Land O'Lakes. Hey, have the mosquitoes hatched this balmy winter?

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Washington: Jon, the Politico is a print mag, similar to roll call, the hill, not really a Web creature...

Jonathan Weisman: Too true, thanks for the plug Jim (or is it John?)

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Re: Atmosphere in the Capitol: How has it changed for the minority? Are you saying that Republicans are less afraid of the Democratic leaders than they were of say, Tom DeLay?

Jonathan Weisman: They are less afraid of their commander in chief and their new leadership. As Jo Ann Emerson said in our paper Sunday, "I feel freer to vote my conscience, or, rather, be exactly the representative my constituents want."

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Vienna, Va.: The Republicans took some criticism on their ethics bill moves (you called "scuttling" the bill in your story yesterday) but isn't Byrd just as big of a "scuttler" as they were? Or maybe even more so?

Jonathan Weisman: I tried to make that point this morning. Republicans took a hit for taking a stand on a seemingly extraneous measure, the quasi-line-tem veto, which had little to do with ethics or lobbying. But all the accommodations that Harry Reid tried to make were blocked by Byrd. Ultimately, Reid found a way around him.

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New York: Don't know if you are an expert on Senate rules, but I saw a posting on a blog last night that said even if Lieberman switched to the Republican party, it wouldn't change the balance of power because committee assignments already have been voted on. Is this true? Seems odd to me.

Jonathan Weisman: It is odd but could be true. The Senate rules and chairmen are set. A simple majority can change the rules, but it would take a 2/3 vote to break a filibuster, should Democrats decide to do that. In the 1950s, there was a time due to a rash of death that the Democrats had the numerical majority but the Republicans maintained control. In a famous exchange, the then-majority leader complained that it was difficult to be the majority leader without a minority. Lyndon Johnson retorted that it was far harder to be the minority leader WITH a majority.

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Corruption in the rebuilding of Iraq and New Orleans: Uh...no on New Orleans. Media Darling Holy Joe Lieberman (I-Beltway Media and Lobbyists) already has stated he won't run investigations of this. Of course you folks will spin that into being some principled stand. Maybe he can run for Pres/VP again with John McCain (R-Beltway Media).

Jonathan Weisman: Man, I'm getting a lot of hits here for bizarre reasons. I said those investigations would be done in the House.

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Marin County: Hollywood has their cast of characters who get awarded special merit for jobs well done. How difficult would it be to set-up a People's Political Award? One given to those fighters-for-right who leap over political disenfranchisement and defend American principles?

Jonathan Weisman: Go ahead, Marin. If you have the ceremony in the Headlands, Mill Valley or Tiburon, count me in.

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Paris, Miss.: I'm disappointed that we're not talking about Pelosi's clothing style anymore. Can we get back to some real substance please! Enough with this "accountability" "reform" "war" yadda yadda.

Jonathan Weisman: I really dug that huge red Pashmina.

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Dunn Loring, Va.: So far your questions you've answered are running almost 10:1 liberal to conservative, with a few seemingly neutral questions thrown in. Is this reflective of the ratio of questions asked, or just the ratio of questioning you/the moderator decide to respond to?

Jonathan Weisman: I'm answering them in the order they come. I don't have time to scan.

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Olympia, Wash,: I don't get it. Why is the question about the Edwards story belonging on the front page "for obvious reasons, a sensitive question?" Do you mean you don't want to criticize a colleague's story? Critiquing the editor's choice of front-page material? Are you suggesting there's no real story there? Just curious. I double-checked the byline to make sure you weren't talking about yourself. In my experience (bought and sold 3 houses over the last 12 years), the seller never meets the buyers, even at signing. Too much can go wrong. But these were ordinary Bay Area houses (small and waaay over-priced, but selling for over asking)...

Jonathan Weisman: Hey, we're all friends and colleagues at the Post. We don't snipe.

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Denver: At this point, is the Libby trial being followed closely in Washington? It has been interesting to see the number of prospective jurors who are unable to serve because they find the VP lacking in credibility. This seems to mean that the VP is an important witness in the upcoming trial and his word will be challenged by another witness.

washingtonpost.com: In Libby Trial, Big Names Make Jury Picks a Tall Order (Post, Jan. 18)

Jonathan Weisman: Yes, it is, but how many stories can you write on jury selection? Wait till the main event begins.

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St Peters, Pa.: Why is it taking Byrd and Obey so long to pass the year-long Continuing Resolution? I still have a hard time imagining Byrd cutting out earmarks for home-state projects. Any idea if the wording of this CR is going to be particularly earmark friendly?

Jonathan Weisman: It's hard work drafting a budget for the entire federal government, and they are being deluged by petitioners. Meanwhile, they are preparing for the war supplemental and trying to decide whether to withhold funds for the war. They are very busy men.

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Rochester, N.Y.: I see you point about the WHCA being a party, but wouldn't you agree that the way the press responded to Colbert last year didn't make you guys look very good? Why are you all so thin-skinned about accusations of having been Bush lap dogs? Methinks you doth protest too much.

Jonathan Weisman: Why am I thin-skinned about being accused of being a Bush lap dog? Hmmm, why are you thin-skinned about being called fat and ugly?

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Washington, D.C.: The McCain ad in Iowa is a MoveOn ad, no? I was surprised when I got an email from them requesting money for it. I know they've been focusing on stopping escalation in Iraq, but to turn it so specifically to McCain seemed to be playing the '08 game awfully early to me...

Jonathan Weisman: Move On at work.

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Pittsburgh: Assuming the pending ethics legislation passes and is signed into law, how long do you suppose it'll be before lobbyists find ways to circumvent it -- just as they did the post-Watergate reforms? They have such inventive minds, dontcha think? And what kind of gutting signing statement do you think Bush will issue on it to help his buddies up on K Street? I'm pessimistic that true reform will occur.

Jonathan Weisman: The day after tomorrow. They're already looking for the loopholes, especially the one where you can wine and dine lawmakers, as long as it's in the context of a fundraiser. Hey, take that trip to Scotland. It's legal as long as you also hand over a bunch of checks.

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Anonymous: Liberals type faster. George Soros paid for us all to take classes.

Jonathan Weisman: I don't know where you're reading my political proclivities, but at Riverwood High School in Atlanta, I didn't have the time for the typing elective.

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Fairfax, Va.: Just a suggestion: in your article today why not tell us which Democrats, for example, voted to strip the more forceful elements out of the ethics bill? How can we the voters keep our representatives accountable if we don't know how they voted?

Jonathan Weisman: We do have the voting database on our politics Web site. Forgive me the oversight. We just have limited space.

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Woonsocket, R.I.: No question, Jonathan, just a comment. As a long-time follower of these chats, I want to thank you for providing the best chats of anyone at the Post. Your typing speed and accuracy are excellent, your replies are well-detailed, and you don't use lame humor to deflect tough questions or belittle questioners. Thanks!

Jonathan Weisman: Thanks for the encouragement.

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Colorado: "As Jo Ann Emerson said in our paper Sunday, 'I feel freer to vote my conscience, or, rather, be exactly the representative my constituents want.' "

I missed that story, I think I'm going to look for it. That's a pretty shocking admission of dereliction of duty isn't it? or at least extreme political hackery.

Jonathan Weisman: I ran into her a few days later and she was quite happy with the quote. I think it says more about the demand for discipline in the GOP majority than her personally.

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Flemington, N.J.: I just read the article on John Edwards' home buyer and I do think it is relevant that a candidate who has been nagging about poverty for four years lives in lavish, multimillion dollar homes himself. However, what I really would like to know about Edwards' poverty issue is what is it he wants the country to do. I've been hearing "Two Americas" for years now and I have no idea policy he wants or what it would cost. Thanks.

washingtonpost.com: Identity of Edwards Home's Buyer Veiled (Post, Jan. 19)

Jonathan Weisman: I'll publish this as is and sign off. Thanks everybody but I've gotta get back to work!

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