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Jonathan Weisman
Washington Post Congressional Reporter
Friday, February 2, 2007; 11:00 AM

Don't want to miss out on the latest in politics? Start each day with The Post Politics Hour. Join in each weekday morning at 11 a.m. as a member of The Washington Post's team of White House and Congressional reporters answers questions about the latest in buzz in Washington and The Post's coverage of political news.

Washington Post Congressional reporter Jonathan Weisman was online Friday, Feb. 2, at 11 a.m. ET to discuss the latest political news and The Post's coverage of politics.

Political analysis from Post reporters and interviews with top newsmakers. Listen live on Washington Post Radio or subscribe to a podcast of the show.

The transcript follows.

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Jonathan Weisman: Sorry I'm running late, but it's been busy, busy busy. Let's get going!

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Cheyenne, Wyo.: Re: Reports of use of weapons manufactured in Iran being used in Iraq -- I notice these reports originate with administrative sources and no weapons are being displayed as evidence. What is The Post doing to verify that these devices really exist and originated in Iran, and are not old surplus items off the world arms market or something ginned up in Cheney's garage? Not to make too fine a point of it, but there is a history of media not checking this administration's claims....

Jonathan Weisman: Cheyenne, has opinion of your native son been changing? We are twice burned on these issues and will be careful. I find the drum beat around Iran -- and the rising fear factor from those who do not want another war -- to be fascinating.

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New York: Will Congressional Chairman Meehan really exit for University of Massachusetts-Lowell campus for $400,000, or is he just hamming it up? He is being interviewed today via phone by search committee.

Jonathan Weisman: I don't know. Wouldn't you?

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Vernon, British Columbia: Good morning. I submitted a question concerning how the conservative base of the GOP seems to be totally unaware of how most of America, as the midterm results clearly would indicate, is in the middle. Yet they still are pushing for uber-conservatives Brownback and Huckabee and according to the op-ed by Novak yesterday, are in strong denial. As good as this looks for the Dems, isn't it in the best interest of the GOP to run a moderate like McCain or even more mainstream like Giuliani? It is inconceivable that they could be so ideologically blind and definitely as stubborn as the President. Have you ever seen such blindness and denial in modern history politics?

washingtonpost.com: The Pollster in Exile: Frank Luntz Runs Into a Wall of GOP Denial (Post, Feb. 1)

Jonathan Weisman: Conservatives still make up the base of the Republican primary voters and they are very unhappy with the prospects of McCain or Giuliani. That said, they may be a practical lot in the end if a more promising candidate does not surface soon. Mitt Romney is making a real run at the disaffected conservative voter but those sound bites for gay rights and abortion rights are mighty fresh.

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Pittsburgh: Good morning and thanks for taking questions. How quickly will the Congress be able to reverse course on the legislation that allows the administration to can U.S. attorneys and replace them with political allies? Any idea why Sen. Specter slipped this provision into the Patriot Act during conference? What gives?

Jonathan Weisman: I have no idea about Specter's bid. The Democrats are raising a lot of noise about the U.S. attorney issue but they have a lot of legislation on their plates -- I'd imagine this is the kind of thing that gets taken care of as a rider to a spending bill, so look for it in September.

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Arlington, Va.: Jonathan -- Your newspaper serves as a primary platform for William Arkin while the obnoxious Dan Froomkin enjoys unfettered access to your readers. (It's not as if The Post provides a counter-balance to his rants in any way, shape or form.) So here you are, trying to talk about "politics." Why should we trust any voice from the rat's nest on 15th Street?

Jonathan Weisman: Because I am coming to you live from the United States Capitol.

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Anonymous: Nick Burns says that even though the Administration made mistakes in Iraq, we should trust them on Iran. Why? More importantly, do any of our allies trust us on Iran?

Jonathan Weisman: I leave that to you, dear readers. As for our allies, I'm not detecting a whole lot of trust.

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St Paul, Minn.: Hi Jonathan -- thanks for taking my question. How likely is a Republican filibuster of any Senate resolution opposing the war? Also, given the intense unpopularity of the war how would the public react to not having some sort of objection -- binding or not -- go forward? It would seem to me to be political suicide for the Republicans, but then there's that base...

Jonathan Weisman: Ah, this is a subject I am very close to, St. Paul, and your Republican senator, Norm Coleman, is in the thick of things. I think Republicans will let the first test vote slide when they have to vote Monday on a motion to proceed to the debate, but as of now GOP leaders do not see 60 votes on a motion at the end of the week to cut off debate. If they can hold the line they will filibuster, but the media will be paying intense attention to the debate and I wouldn't be surprised if by week's end they decide it just will look too horrible to filibuster a final vote on a non-binding resolution.

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Pittsburgh: In view of the ongoing scooter Libby trial, is it constitutionally permissible to impeach and convict a sitting Vice President? If so would it be more advantageous to the Democrats to get Cheney out sooner or to keep him in office as something to run against in 2008?

Jonathan Weisman: Dang that's a good question. And yes, it can be done in a day.

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Irvington, N.Y.: Thank you for taking my question. I'm a little confused by all the haggling over the language of the non binding resolution. I think history will remember that the resolution said the Senate disagrees with the President's decision to send more troops into Baghdad. The rest of the language will be a footnote. If this is a "symbolic" act isn't the passage of the resolution far more important then the actual language?

Jonathan Weisman: That's one argument but I think the haggling is very sincere. In the compromise resolution a provision states firmly that the Senate does not support cutting off funds for troops in the field, and it calls for continuing the fight in Anbar province. Yes it's non-binding, but if Democrats want to come back and curb funds or try to pull back troops the Republicans would use the vote as ammunition to say they are flip-flopping.

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Miami: Regarding Vernon, B.C.'s question on a mainstream Republican, why doesn't anyone ever mention Condi Rice as a mainstream African-American? None of the Biden buzz over Obama and African-Americans as "clean and articulate" mentioned Condi, so am I to assume she is not included in the discussion of mainstream African-Americans?

Jonathan Weisman: Hmm, I'm a little baffled. What is your question here?

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Sewickley, Pa.: So Jonathan, is the surge 21,500 or 48,000? Will the administration tell you/us?

Jonathan Weisman: It's probably somewhere in between, and no, they probably never will give us an answer. The Congressional Budget Office was using historical data to extrapolate the larger number of support personnel that would have to accompany the trigger-pullers, but this Pentagon likes to do deployments on the cheap. Just a week ago Gen. Schoomaker, the Army chief of staff, said no additional support personnel would be needed but written answers to the Senate by Gen. Casey yesterday flatly contradicted that. He enumerated lots of additional folks that would be needed, though he said they would be "minimal" in number.

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Prescott, Ariz.: I just looked over the key points of the NIE releases to the public today, and my reading was that U.S. forces don't have a lot of ability to make things better, just keep the worsening situation less-bad. Given that previous NIE's were described as even more grim in their classified formats, this public version probably is an optimistic assessment. Does this change the dynamics on the hill and make even more Senators support an anti-surge resolution?

Jonathan Weisman: I think it confirms what a lot of people already believe. The Republicans who want to back the president will do so out of loyalty and hope -- lots of hope. If that hope hasn't been shaken yet this won't change anything.

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Rockville, Md.: Okay, my last comment: "As for our allies, I'm not detecting a whole lot of trust." Really? How about all the progress at the U.N.? That is real and the result of lots of work over a long span of time. We are about to make a difference through diplomacy -- can this be done without trust?

Jonathan Weisman: The question was specifically targeted at military action. And I stand by my answer.

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Des Moines, Iowa: Okay, that dang good question about Cheney being impeached begs this question ... who else is seen as his replacement other than Secretary Rice? Whether he is impeached or leaves office for health reasons is there any truth to the rumors that she is seen by President Bush as his most loyal and trusted adviser and therefore the only person to be the next VP? And if so, what impact does that have for the 2008 race?

Jonathan Weisman: Hey, Chief of Staff John Bolten keeps rising through the ranks. And Karl Rove is still waiting in the wings!

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Rockville, Md.:"obnoxious Dan Froomkin..." -- but look at his work level! He must be writing all the time. And all of his quotes -- everyone gets a shot to be heard.

Jonathan Weisman: Dan, you have a fan.

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Claverack, N.Y.: You know what scares me? Not that the Cartoon Network pulled a stupid publicity stunt. Not even that Boston police overreacted and shut the whole city down so they could remove the Light Brites. No, what scares me is Boston officials standing up there afterwards and saying they behaved exactly the way they should have and wouldn't do anything different the next time. They burn witches don't they?

Jonathan Weisman: Not a very political observation, but wow, that was a strange episode.

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Sewickley, Pa.: Mr. Bush says that the administration doesn't get credit for the "great" economy because citizens are "unsettled" about Iraq. I have another explanation -- since his first inauguration the economy has generated just 3.5 million private sector jobs. During the same time frame in the previous administration 16.5 million private sector jobs had been created. Can the administration really think that 3.5 million jobs in six years is a great economy or do they just have nothing better to pitch?

Jonathan Weisman: They like to look at the macro picture: low unemployment rates, record corporate profits, a stock market recovery, strong GDP growth. It's hard to argue that the economy writ large is doing well; the arguments come at the micro level.

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Harrington Park, N.J.: What do you make of the public criticism of Michael Gordon of The Times following his appearance on Charlie Rose where he voiced his opinion about Iraq?

Jonathan Weisman: Reporters on television -- and in online chats -- put themselves in a perilous place: we are supposed to keep our opinions to ourselves and at the same time be engaging and fun. That said, Tom Ricks' book "Fiasco" definitely takes a strong point of view -- backed up extensively by facts -- and no one has jumped on him.

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Arlington, Va.: I saw a poll that indicated that more than 70 percent of Iraqis want the U.S. out of Iraq, yet I see no mention of Iraqi opinion in The Post. Is there a reason for that?

Jonathan Weisman: We mention Iraqi public opinion all the time. The most amazing one was that a majority of Iraqis say it is okay to kill American troops.

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Iowa: One day this week, Iowa's front page story was the funeral of a 46-year-old grandmother who died in Iraq. Today the front page story is about a 21-year-old "all-American" boy who died in Iraq. I think it is going to be very hard for a Democrat who is not seriously and publicly "anti-war" to do well in the caucuses.

Jonathan Weisman: I think by the time the votes are cast in the Iowa caucuses the Democrats will be united in their push to pull out the troops if legislation to that effect hasn't already passed. Sen. Chuck Schumer -- no slouch on political prognostication -- doesn't even think Iraq will be much of an issue in the 2008 campaign because Republicans and Democrats all will be on the same page. It has reached the point where most Americans seem to know somebody who knows somebody who has died or been wounded. That's critical.

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Kansas City, Mo.: What was the inside reaction to the news about Al Franken running for Senate? I saw reports that Franken was talking to the state reps but also heard comments he wasn't the favorite choice among Democrats, but the GOP might want him to run.

Jonathan Weisman: The reaction on Capitol Hill was "the DFL can't do better?"

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Freising, Germany: Initially, after a significant amount of coverage of the dilemma in Somalia, there's been a noticeable lack of coverage of an area that could become another hot spot in the fight against terrorism.

The San Francisco Chronicle ran an article, Somalia is important to America -- African country reflects Iraq and Afghanistan, but otherwise there's been little information about a conflict-in-the-making that could be nipped in the bud with a bit of effort. Any idea of what's happening out there at the Horn of Africa in terms of anti-terrorism efforts?

Jonathan Weisman: Freising, this is a political chat -- you are way over my head. But I agree that coverage has slacked off since the Islamists were routed by the Ethiopians.

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Atlanta: What's up now for Biden? Did Obama's gentlemanly response help him or will it all blow over?

Jonathan Weisman: It was not a great start for Biden, but even without his little gaffe, he was entering as a dark horse. And everything that happens seems to help Obama. He may be the George W. Bush of 2008 -- just damned lucky.

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New York: Hi Jonathan. Now that Bush has admitted that dropping the "ic" was an "oversight" can we expect he'll refer to the party correctly from now on?

Jonathan Weisman: No. It's in the blood of every conservative.

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Princeton, N.J.: From the NY Times 1/26: "At least one case, the one in Oregon, is probably not moot. It goes beyond the other cases in seeking damages from the government, because the plaintiffs say they have seen proof that they were wiretapped without a warrant.

"In August 2004, the Treasury Department's Office of Foreign Assets Control, which was investigating an Oregon charity, al-Haramain Islamic Foundation, inadvertently provided a copy of a classified document to a foundation lawyer, Lynne Bernabei.

"That document indicated, according to court filings, that the government monitored communications between officers of the charity and two of its lawyers without a warrant in spring 2004.

" 'If I gave you this document today and you put it on the front page of The New York Times, it would not threaten national security,' Mr. Eisenberg, a lawyer for the foundation, said. 'There is only one thing about it that's explosive, and that's the fact that our clients were wiretapped.'

"Ms. Bernabei circulated the document to two directors of the charity, at least one of them in Saudi Arabia, and to three other lawyers. She discussed them with two more lawyers. A reporter for The Washington Post, David B. Ottaway, also reviewed the document."

This shows Bush lied when he said the only intercepts were between terrorists outside the country and US Nationals. This shows he clearly broke the law, FISA. He also interfered with the attorney client-privilege. Is the Post ever going to let Ottaway write about this story?

Jonathan Weisman: We are the paper that wrote of secret CIA prisons and published the Pentagon papers. We do not stifle our reporters.

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Seattle: On October 25, Bush said "Americans have no intention of taking sides in a sectarian struggle or standing in the crossfire between rival factions." So how do you see the situation now given that the CIA and everyone else have come to agreement that "civil war" or "sectarian struggle" is the primary situation in Iraq?

Jonathan Weisman: You've touched on the central issue wracking Congress now. Nobody wants U.S. forces in this fight between Sunni and Shia. The question is how to confront the administration to force troops to pull back from the sectarian battle.

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Correction: Chief of Staff Josh Bolten. John was U.N. ambassador.

Jonathan Weisman: No sirree. John Bolton and Josh Bolten are not the same people. Josh rides a Harley, was a deputy chief of staff, a budget director and is now chief of staff.

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Rockville, Md.: Okay, I lied. I will write some more. "The question was specifically targeted at military action. And I stand by my answer." Good answer -- I just thought we had someone on board with us at the U.N. Certainly I believe you.

Jonathan Weisman: All clear.

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Chicago: Good morning ... with climate change in the headlines today it seems appropriate to ask -- is there any sense in Congress that they must do something about this issue as the White House refuses to? It seems a bipartisan issue at this point.

Jonathan Weisman: There is a huge fight brewing on climate change. Some Democrats really want to force Bush's hand even if he simply vetoes what they send up. Others want incremental legislation that Bush can sign. And others -- like Commerce Committee Chairman John Dingell (D-Mich.) -- will not do anything that they fear will hurt the U.S. auto industry. Watch this one closely.

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Trust but Verify: Better to trust the rat's nest on 15th St to the one at 16th and Pennsylvania.

Jonathan Weisman: Both places really do have bona fide rats.

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New York: Jonathan, given the heated questioning and criticism of Gen. Casey by the senators do you think he'll be confirmed as Army Chief of Staff? Wouldn't this be a good place to express a "binding" dissatisfaction with the escalation, which he defends? Thanks for answering questions this morning.

Jonathan Weisman: I think Casey gets confirmed. It takes a huge hew and cry to deny the president the team he wants, especially on war, and Democrats don't want to look like they are micromanaging the war effort. Many just don't want to take any of the blame for it. That said, I was fascinated by John McCain's political stratagem here: Don't blame Bush, blame the generals. Dya think that'll fly?

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Columbus, Ohio: I find it difficult to believe that Gore will not run for president. It seems as if a perfect storm is brewing in his favor -- his movie has been nominated for an Academy Award, he has been nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize, many on the left are looking for a candidate who opposed the Iraq war from the very beginning and a viable alternative to Hillary, and a little more than half of America believes he already was cheated out of the presidency. Could the situation be any more favorable for a run by Gore? Is there any indication he is paying attention?

Jonathan Weisman: You're right -- the atmosphere is great. But he's still a lousy campaigner. I think he's enjoying himself too much.

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Roseland N.J.: I soon hope to see "The New Odd Couple", starring Obama in Armani and Biden in a Delaware Blue Hen sweatshirt and ball cap. "Can two Senators share a ticket without driving each other crazy?"

Jonathan Weisman: Biden will be his Secretary of State -- or better yet U.N. ambassador, where his oratory skills really would come in handy.

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Burlington, Vt.: The government has been operating under a continuing resolution since December; even if a budget is passed in the next month or two, do you foresee any long-term impact on programs i.e. social, education, health programs etc., that have been forced to cut back while the resolution has been in effect?

Jonathan Weisman: Well, the Democrats are trying to make some adjustments to spending for the next seven months to alleviate any real crunches out there. The House has passed a real budget bill. The Senate should follow before Feb. 15, when the current stop-gap spending measure expires.

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Chevy Chase, Md.: I'm thinking that we need to institute a Molly Ivins Award in the Politics Chat Room for the Most Colorful Skewering of an Executive or Legislative Branch Official. Kind of an Academy Award for political commentary. David Ignatius, bless him, will never win. Froomkin, maybe, if he gets right worked up. Weingarten sometimes gets angrier than a rattlesnake in a wet Stetson. He might win but he quit working.

Jonathan Weisman: Bless your heart, hon -- what about me?

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Washington: Does anyone in charge in the Administration concede that "we have to win so as not to fail" isn't very inspiring outside of the neo-con cheering section? Also does anyone over there understand that with the Administration's track record on truth and facts, the President's backbone in the face of public opinion doesn't seem so much like character and commitment to ideals as foolish obstinacy?

Jonathan Weisman: I think they do know what they're up against, but what are they to do? This president is not going to end the war he started on any terms that would look like defeat.

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Cambridge, Mass.: So what if some of the arms are manufactured in Iran? Iran happens to be an arms producer and obviously there is a black market for arms -- it is naive to think otherwise. If they come across Chinese weapons does that mean we should start thinking about invading China? If they come across U.S. weapons does that mean the Democrats are supplying them? Jeesh, can the media someday begin to see through this administration's spinning?

Jonathan Weisman: Oh please. Do you really think the media is acting like administration stenographers on the Iran issue? I think we have been appropriately skeptical but still have a duty to print what the administration is saying so people like you can get up-in-arms about arms.

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Iowa: Love the idea of a Molly Ivins Award -- but maybe it should be a Razzie?

Jonathan Weisman: She once said you can say anything about anyone -- as long as you first say "bless her heart..."

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Rolla, Mo.: Obama may have the magic but the climate may be warming for Gore this year. At what point does it become too late for him to jump in?

Jonathan Weisman: See above. He's having too good a time angling for sainthood to jump into the gutter.

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Warrenville, Ill.: Earlier this week a German judge indicated that the country's courts expect to charge 13 CIA employees for kidnapping a German national and sending him to another country for torture and interrogation. Will such charges have any political impact on Congressional debates? On relationships between the White House and the Congress? On the CIA and its work? Or is the "surge" such a large issue that smaller matters -- like charging CIA agents for violating human rights -- are going to disappear?

Jonathan Weisman: I would imagine they will have no impact at all. Republicans will say those darned Europeans are overreaching again with their irrational hatred of all things American, and Democrats have enough to be upset about.

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Where, oh where...: is that "Phase 2" report about the perceived manipulation/cherry-picking of Intelligence that Sen. Roberts promised? Is it basically scrapped even though there's a new congress?

Jonathan Weisman: As Roberts no longer is chairman, I'd bet Rockefeller gets it done -- but last I checked they were through literally combing thousands of pages of statements and docments. The Democrats have been in charge for all of one month -- they do need a little time.

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Washington: I am not sure why Senator McCain continues to get a pass from the media. His positions and statements about Iraq have been at least as contradictory as the President himself -- I could myself point out a few. Before the war began he claimed (and this is on a video recording) that it would be a cakewalk. Only in October he claimed Iraq just needed 20,000 more troops. Now he says Iraq needs 50,000 more troops. He continues shifting blame about Iraq -- one day he says its Vice President's fault and the next day claims it is Gen. Casey's fault. Seems to me he blames everybody except the President, himself and Joe for everything that is going wrong in the war. Indeed, compared to him John Kerry looks more like a straight-talker. Why does the media continue to potray him as a honorable moderate guy? He is anything but that.

Jonathan Weisman: I'm not sure why you think McCain is getting a pass. We did a big, front page story on McCain and the war that was anything but starry-eyed.

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Greenhorn Beanpole: In seeking the presidency, Barack Obama announces his intentions from Illinois, a state 49th in the nation in terms of job growth. Perhaps the problem was too small for him to notice, just like all the out-of-work people or those trapped in dead-end jobs. Clearly it will be easier at the National level -- this larger playing field surely will showcase skills that can't produce diddly in Illinois. Vote Barack Obama -- vote Greenhorn Beanpole.

Jonathan Weisman: Beanpole, do you really hold a senator with two years experience under his belt responsible for Illinois' economy?

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Rockville, Md.: I have been in combat with the First Infantry Division in Vietnam and know very well what battle can do, so I should be for any way to stop the war -- most of the public is of that mind. So why do I think those in government are still more concerned with elections, how they can present their cases so it seems they care about our nation and its future? I sense a disconnect in communications but if most of the country agrees, it can not be that bad.

Jonathan Weisman: I sense you are right. What is remarkable to me is that public opinion could be so overwhelmingly against the war in Iraq, yet so many lawmakers, including the Democratic leadership, are wringing their hands with worry over what to do.

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Raleigh, N.C.: About the nonbinding resolution ... it has been attacked from the left as insufficient, as Congress wussing out despite the recent elections and all the polling data. On the other hand it has been defended as laying a predicate for later more-decisive action, such as cutting off funding. Who is right?

Jonathan Weisman: Both -- it is a bit wimpy but Democratic leaders are promising a next step. That will be when the real fun begins.

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Winter Park, Fla.: I've been keeping track of what's going on in the Scooter Libby trial, and I still feel like I haven't heard anything explaining what started it all in the first place: Why in the world would the fact that Joseph Wilson's wife was a CIA operative make him less trustworthy? It would seem to me that that might make his findings more trustworthy -- what am I missing here?

Jonathan Weisman: It is hard to go back over that ground with every story but it is a big question. The argument was that Wilson didn't know what he was doing -- that he was basically on a junket in Niger arranged by his CIA wife and that his say-so on Niger yellowcake should not be given any credence.

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Rockville, Md.: What are the chances for a grand compromise? Baker-Hamilton seems like history and they don't like the Republican bill in the Senate. I thought when Sen. Webb mentioned Eisenhower's exit from Korea that we had a test balloon. He did manage to stop the fighting even though we still have problems there. But that has not been mentioned since then. Could McCain broker a compromise in the Senate? Who is on the knight's horse?

Jonathan Weisman: McCain is not in this fight -- he's too vested in the "surge" to criticize it and Democrats are under too much pressure to oppose it to deal with McCain. The compromise was struck already, with John Warner. Now let's see if the Republicans and Democrats on the fringe can e brought on board.

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Minneapolis: If a Democratic Senator had attacked Gen. Casey the way McCain did yesterday wouldn't the press be full of stories this morning about how the Democrats are "blaming the troops"?

Jonathan Weisman: As I said earlier I do find McCain's strategy curious. He won't blame the president but he will blame the general.

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Montgomery Village, Md.: Jonathan: Do you think the CBO's comments that the real number of troops -- combat and support -- for the surge/escalation is closer to 40,000 or 45,000 will cause more push-back by Senate Democrats who already are upset at the compromise language Reid agreed to? It seems we have another less-than-full disclosure of facts by the White House.

Jonathan Weisman: I think opinions are set. I do believe the CBO estimates will yield a lot more hearings to try to get the administration to fess up on just how many people they want sent over there.

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One more for Gore: The new Florida Gov. announced they are moving to have verifiable paper ballots. Kinda of an admission that things didn't go well ('06 and'00) and that Gore won Florida, if all the votes had been able to be counted. You know it's bad when a GOP governor trashes the state's system that put a Republican in office.

Jonathan Weisman: I think you're stretching it by saying the governor has handed victory to Gore. In 2000 they had r ballot. Remember those swinging chads?

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Re: Economic indicators: The trouble with only quoting unemployment rates and new job creation rates is that it doesn't take into consideration that the new jobs created and taken pay less than the old jobs lost. The factor that needs to be more seriously analyzed is income levels. Getting off unemployment doesn't mean you have a good job, just any job -- even at two-thirds the salarary as the one you lost.

Jonathan Weisman: The problem with national data these days is that the job market and economic indicators all are connected to the international economy. That's why corporate profits can be so high and wage pressure can remain so low.

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Arlington, Va.: But who goes on a junket to Niger? Wouldn't The Bahamas be a better choice?

Jonathan Weisman: You've never sunned yourself on the reedy banks of the great gray-reen River Niger?

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Washington: I've been reading some speculation reagarding how "embarassed" the Republican senators who sign the resolution will be if this surge actually works. So just what are the criteria for whether it "works" or not? And how long before that's determined? And who determines it?

Jonathan Weisman: OK, last question folks. The administration seems to think we should see results in a few months -- delining violence in Baghdad and the disarming of the militias -- so keep an eye out. Sayonara everybody!

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