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Washington Post White House Reporter Anne E. Kornblut.
Washington Post White House Reporter Anne E. Kornblut. (washingtonpost.com - washingtonpost.com)

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Anne E. Kornblut
Washington Post National Political Reporter
Wednesday, October 15, 2008; 11:00 AM

Don't want to miss out on the latest in politics? Start each day with The Post Politics Hour. Join in each weekday morning at 10 a.m. as a member of The Washington Post's team of White House and Congressional reporters answers questions about the latest in buzz in Washington and The Post's coverage of political news.

Washington Post national political reporter Anne E. Kornblut was online Wednesday, Oct. 15 at 11 a.m. ET to discuss the latest in political news.

The transcript follows.

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Archive: Post Politics Hour discussion transcripts

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Anne E. Kornblut: Good morning everyone! I hope you're all doing well, and savoring every moment with just three weeks left until the election. What's on your minds?

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Aftermath: I am always proud to see former Presidents Bush and Clinton together (as in Texas yesterday) trying to help out in times of need. Do you think the current president will join them on these good will missions when he is out of office?

Anne E. Kornblut: You know, I actually do. He seems to get along really well with Clinton, and obviously his own dad -- and we know he's on decent terms with both the prospective future presidents. So when he's not clearing brush at the ranch, I wouldn't be surprised to see him out there on similar missions.

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Ellicott City, Md.: Being behind in the polls, McCain will want to try another new tack. His advisers want him to attack Obama regarding the Rev. Wright, even though they know it's risky. At this point, why don't they just take the risk of restarting the Straight Talk Express? If they have nothing to lose, why not just be brutally honest?

Anne E. Kornblut: That's a great question -- and I bet the McCain campaign is getting all sorts of advice along these lines right now (although I also would bet that they would say they are being brutally honest already). Reporters sure do miss those days of unfettered access, I can tell you that.

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Alexandria, Va.: The Post Health section recently did an article on heroin addiction. I have read articles citing Obama's book where he admits to being a cocaine user. Clinton's pot use was covered by the major newspaper. Why hasn't Obama drug use been a major issue?

Anne E. Kornblut: It sounds like there are a couple of different questions in here -- we certainly have mentioned it, and as you point out, Obama himself talked about it in his book. The question of why it hasn't been a bigger issue is a good one -- I'm just guessing here, but I think that the fact that it took place so long ago and that he disclosed it himself are reasons why it hasn't been a consuming question.

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Silver Spring, Md.: What sort of impact do you think early voting will have on this election? In the most recent SurveyUSA poll, which has Obama up five percentage points in Ohio, Obama is up 18 points among people who already have voted. Even in red state Georgia, the most recent poll I saw there showed Obama down six percentage points or so overall, but up among those who already have voted. It seems that even if McCain were to turn this thing around, the fact that early voting has started in so many swing states at the height of an economic meltdown would leave him an uphill battle.

Anne E. Kornblut: You make a really good observation -- and it's a point the Obama campaign makes, too. They feel extremely good about the early voting, for a whole host of reasons, including that it probably will reflect the polling of today (not 20 days from now), in which Obama is way up.

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Fairfax County, Va.: Interesting letter to the editor in today's paper regarding McCain's response to the woman who called Obama an Arab. I noticed right away that he quickly said no, Obama is a decent guy. Wait a minute, Arabs aren't "decent guys"? I'm surprised more wasn't made of that.

Anne E. Kornblut: "The Daily Show" did a funny riff on this last night, too. It's along the same lines as the "he's not Muslim!" argument -- the logical follow-up question being "so what if he were?"

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Anonymous: I have received an e-mail ostensibly sent from Dale Lindsborg of the Washington Post. It refers to an interview with Obama on this past Sunday's "Meet The Press" where he talks about why he doesn't believe in saluting the flag. Is this really a person who works for The Post?

Anne E. Kornblut: We just checked the database here, and I can't find a Dale Lindsborg. I'm going to make sure people here know about it. Can you send us the e-mail?

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Austin, Texas: Anne, when are reporters going to stop believing the McCain campaign (or the Obama campaign, or especially the Bush administration) when they are told "listen to this ... it's new"? On Monday, McCain unveiled his "new" stump speech. It was reported widely as being "feisty," "new" and meant to shake up his campaign. Yet Jon Stewart and his team of TiVo gnomes (which, by the way, every news outlet should have since you can get college kids to do this for free for a semester) was able to show that it was just a mashup of his old stump speech and his Republican National Committee acceptance speech.

Anne E. Kornblut: To be fair, there are parts of his speech that, in the past few days, are new -- especially the economic details. And, being news reporters (credo: what's new here?), we tend to grab onto the new parts, not the old. That said, the Stewart piece was hysterical, and something that only TV could do real justice to.

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Henly, Texas: Anne, is the light getting brighter at the end of the campaign tunnel? You guys must be exhausted. Hang in there, girl! Has Palin stuck her hand in a hornet's nest with her "complaint" to the Alaska Personnel Board? Alaskans seem to be increasingly embarrassed by Palin, and the board seems to be unexpectedly serious in investigating "Troopergate." They could well find -- as opposed to the Legislative investigator -- that Monegan's dismissal, while within the authority of Palin, was done for an illegal reason, i.e. Monegan's refusal to perform an illegal act. Sounds like the Personnel Board may even report prior to the election. Is all of this making it even harder on Stevens and Young? Might Alaska bolt and vote "D" this year?

Anne E. Kornblut: Thank you so much. Twenty days left! I am too far away to predict what Alaska will do, but from afar it does look like this is quite a mess for her, and them.

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Dallas: Anne, thanks for these chats. For the layman, can you explain what one is to make of polls that show anywhere from a four- to a 12-point gap between the candidates? Reading them is a little crazy-making. If this doesn't end soon, I'm going to have to start breathing into a paper bag.

Anne E. Kornblut: Tell me about it! The polls always verge on insanity at this stage of the campaign, in my experience. But I will say a few things: One is, remember the margin of error. If there's a plus-or-minus five point margin of error, that really means there could be a 10-point swing -- so a race that looks tied (50-50) could really be 55-45 in either direction, which isn't a tie at all. So you can just build in, mentally, a wide swing into all these polls, and bear in mind that it's a sample and a snapshot in time, not an accurate prediction of what's actually going to happen on Nov. 4.

Secondly, a lot of smart pollsters believe that the most important part of the poll isn't the to- line indicator, but the trends underneath it -- how the country is feeling, and which directions the candidates are heading in. So, for example, it would be far more unsettling for McCain to see that his trend line on a number of issues (the economy, taxes, etc) is heading downward than that he is just behind by nine points. Lastly: Don't forget the electoral college! The national polls are important because they tell you how people are really feeling, but the state ones matter, too. Does that make sense?

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Washington: I just read that VP Cheney is experiencing an abnormal heart rhythm. Certainly hope that he is okay. Made me wonder what he's been up to lately. Has he done any campaigning for McCain in any way? Is he involved in the campaign doing general fundraising?

washingtonpost.com: Cheney experiences abnormal heart rhythm (AP, Oct. 15)

Anne E. Kornblut: I have absolutely no idea -- good question. But in the meantime, I would highly recommend my friend and colleague Bart Gellman's new book, "Angler," which is about the Cheney vice presidency.

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Austin, Texas: Re:: Clinton -- this will come as surprise to no one reading this, but most of Clinton's time in Texas was spent on fundraisers and rallies for Texas Democrats (Chris Bell running for State Senate in a winnable GOP district, Rick Noriega running for U.S. Senate, etc.). That's not meant as a knock -- I'm a big Clinton fan. Just an FYI.

Anne E. Kornblut: Thanks for the reporting from on the ground there (and by the way, those of us who covered Bush are going to miss coming to Texas so much). My understanding is that Clinton is doing a lot of fundraising all over the place (including for herself still), but that the Obama campaign is quite happy with her effort. It may not be the same story for her husband, but they are happy with her.

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Anonymous: Obama quote debunked: Snopes conducted their usual thorough research on the e-mail that quoted Obama on "Meet the Press." It's entirely false. You can read why here.

Anne E. Kornblut: Thank you. And thanks to Snopes!

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New York: For this election and the current fiscal times I have become an unmitigated news junkie and reader, listener, and chat-room participant. I am going to volunteer for the candidate of my choice. (I never have done that.) This all could be what Malcolm Knowles postulated -- that adults will learn when they are seeking solutions to a problem. But I am hearing similar stories from friends and peers of all ages and social status.

Do you think this will continue post-election and as the economy fairs better? Can this be seen as a sea change in Americans' involvement in their government? A change that will continue if whoever is elected seeks to channel that energy and opinion? I can see more votes in Congress being put on the Web live with lots of debates and discussion to scare the poop out of our elected officials. Or am I just having a pipe dream?

Anne E. Kornblut: That is such great news! Keep it up! And not just because an increased interest in news might prop up my ailing industry. It's very hard to predict what will happen in terms of engagement; I thought that, after Sept. 11, there would be a sudden and lasting burst of interest in foreign news that would change the country; it doesn't seem to have happened, at least not much beyond Iraq and Afghanistan, and not even then at times. But perhaps it's something that takes longer, and requires more than just one defining event, so that people like you will become involved for a period of years. What do others think?

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Richmond, Va.: Crazy election. No matter how anyone votes, the "voters don't elect senators as president" rule will be broken. Also, regardless of the winner, the new president will have been born outside the U.S.!

Anne E. Kornblut: Isn't it wild?

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Fairfax, Va.: What has caused Liddy Dole to fall behind in her re-election race?

Anne E. Kornblut: My understanding is that it has been a few things -- changing demographics in North Carolina, Dole's absence from the state most of the time, and a really well-run campaign, predicated on the Dole-is-a-carpet-bagger theme. Kay Hagan also is enjoying a wave of help from Obama supporters in the state.

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Savage, Md.: Has the White House sent a congratulatory message (or issued any sort of statement) on Paul Krugman's having won the Nobel Prize in economics? Is he likely to be invited soon to the Oval Office for a chat on the financial crisis?

Anne E. Kornblut: That's a terrific question, and I have no idea what the answer is. My guess is that the Republican establishment does not hold the Nobel committee in especially high regard -- and that they might interpret the award to Krugman as political, and thus not be eager to have him over for hot dogs. But stranger things have happened.

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Scarsdale, N.Y.: Look, the market is down, but it always comes back and goes even higher. Iraq seemed hopeless, but the surge saved the country and secured the resources there. So talking about "issues" just distracts from the men seeking the presidency. Do you really know Obama? Did he study in a madrassah? What's his real religion? Does he know any other terrorists besides Ayers? That's what matters to me and to most people I talk to about this election.

Anne E. Kornblut: Do I detect sarcasm? We don't do sarcasm around here. Or cynicism.

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Prescott, Ariz.: Is G. Gordon Liddy considered a terrorist? It is easy to argue that his Watergate-era actions and schemes damaged the American government more than anything William Ayers ever did, and he's not exactly repentant either; he was encouraging people to shoot federal agents in the head a few short years ago. Why hasn't McCain's support for Liddy, which included McCain saying he supported Liddy's stand on the issues and fundraising at his house, been vetted like Obama's link to Ayers has?

Anne E. Kornblut: That's a good question; I'll just post it here and ask the rest of you what you think.

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Washington: Hi Anne. When was the last time a president came into office and really changed the culture and atmosphere of Washington? Is there any chance at all that McCain or Obama could do this?

Anne E. Kornblut: It's tough. I see you're writing from here, so you probably know that already. But in my view, it's a question of tone and priorities -- what the president wants to get done, and how he goes about communicating it. And at this point, all we have to go on, really, is how both of these candidates have run their campaigns -- because those are the roles that have put them in charge of something, rather than just having them in a group of 100 senators.

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Re: Richmond, Va.: Outside the continental U.S., you mean! Hawaii and the Panama Canal Zone (back in '36) are or were part of the U.S.

Anne E. Kornblut: Yes, of course, thanks for pointing that out. We are being so mainland-ist.

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Obama born in Hawaii!: Anne, just mistakenly wrote: "Yes, isn't it wild?" in response to the false claim that both senators were born outside the U.S. While McCain was born in Panama, Obama was born in Hawaii -- which, if I'm correct, is a bona fide U.S. state. No?

Anne E. Kornblut: Outside the mainland, the lower 48, is what I am sure the writer meant -- or, if the writer did not mean that, should have. Apologies to everyone. Both McCain and Obama are U.S. citizens with totally legal claims to the presidency.

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Raleigh, N.C.: Good morning. Which do you think has been a bigger factor in John McCain's slide in the polls ... the financial crisis itself, or McCain's (and Obama's) reactions to the crisis?

Anne E. Kornblut: Is it cheating to say both? Because I really think that's the right answer.

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Bethesda, Md.: Do you think the debate tonight will have more viewers then the previous debate(s)? What portion of the audience will be undecided voters? Will we hear about Ayers in the debate tonight?

Anne E. Kornblut: 1. I don't know, but probably not. 2. There's no way to know that just yet. 3. My guess is yes.

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Alexandria, Va.: What's your take on the increasing number of usual Republican-leaning pundits now turning on McCain/Palin and getting pummeled by the remaining true believers in the hustings?

Anne E. Kornblut: It seems like it really has divided the Republican Party, and has created a subset of conservatives who aren't just unhappy with the Palin pick as a a political matter but feel it defies what the GOP stands for -- exceptionalism, in particular. What I will be curious to see is how it affects not just the pundit class but also the Republican Party overall -- in particular in places where it is struggling, such as the Northeast.

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Baltimore: I think the next few weeks will be interesting. This is the time where McCain -- and the RNC -- will have to make decisions on where to pull out of states in order to protect other states/seats. As a political observer, what should we be looking for in the next few weeks? Do you think the RNC will cut off support for McCain in some states (Pennsylvania, Iowa, etc.) to help save House or Senate seats?

Anne E. Kornblut: That's exactly something we're looking for. We're wondering how long McCain can stay in Pennsylvania in particular -- and whether he has been visiting there in the past few days so much as something of a final stand. We're in that stage of the race where the travel schedules will tell you almost everything you need to know about the campaign strategies.

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When was the last time a president came into office and really changed the culture and atmosphere of Washington?: Let's see, I believe that would be Jed Bartlet.

Anne E. Kornblut: Remember that?

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Reston, Va.: Have there been any recent updates on how Sen. Kennedy is doing these days? Is he still expected to return to the Senate next January?

Anne E. Kornblut: The last I heard he was not doing too well, but I am not sure about his prospects in January.

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Jackson Hole, Wyo.: Will Cheney's health come up as part of the debate to help understand the role of vice president?

Anne E. Kornblut: I tend to doubt it; both of these vice presidential candidates seem to be in decent health, and have receded somewhat back into the traditional, secondary roles as people have turned to watch the presidential candidates themselves. But it is a good reminder of how Cheney has changed that job; thank you for pointing that out.

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Richmond, Va.: Many people claim that Palin is in good position to run in 2012 if McCain loses. I have a hard time seeing how this is true, seeing how ineffective she has been except with the hardcore Republican base. I am interested in your views in regard to her candidacy in 2012. Thanks for chatting with us.

Anne E. Kornblut: I think we won't know until Election Day whether she'll be in a good position to run -- for example, if the Republican ticket loses by eight points, it will be hard for her to take all the blame. And four years, as we know, is a long time and ample opportunity for anyone to rebuild a candidacy. It would not surprise me at all to see her run in 2012; in fact, she will have a stronger claim to being the face of the Republican Party than just about anyone, won't she?

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Merle, N.Y.: I have a theory as to why McCain won't launch a Wright attack, and I was wondering if you could shine any light on my baseless, wild speculation. The theory is that Wright, as a Navy Corpsman may have treated McCain's father or some other family member at Bethesda Medical Center. Wright treated high-level people there, including President Johnson in 1966, so a vice admiral like McCain's father would make sense. Again, just wild speculation, but a possible difference between Wright and Ayers. Any thoughts?

Anne E. Kornblut: I hadn't thought of it in that light; I'll go ahead and post it here, because it's really thoughtful. Thank you.

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Re: Liddy: Anne, I hate to bash the media here, but I blame them (less print, more broadcast). I think the media, mostly the cable news media, can drive stories any way they want, and a lot of the cable news media, by having talking heads and pundits on, repeat a lot of talking points and do very little investigative reporting on their own (unlike print). As a result, because Ayers has been a Republican talking point and Liddy (or some of McCain's other connections to shady people) has not even been brought up by Obama, the media are reporting on one and not the other.

Anne E. Kornblut: Look, there's no question that we (and especially TV outlets) give a lot of time to talking heads who come armed with partisan talking points, and that lets the campaigns drive their agendas on the airwaves all day long. But you are right -- that doesn't absolve us from doing the hard legwork of figuring out what's right and fair, and it's too bad that we don't devote more energy to that.

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Fairfax, Va.: Where does Mitt Romney stand on the financial crisis? Given that pundits touted him as strong on the economy, he doesn't seem to have much of a presence on the campaign trail as a surrogate.

Anne E. Kornblut: I've seen him here and there; if I'm not mistaken, he was recently in Michigan, even though McCain officially has pulled out of there (speaking of 2012...)

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New York: Hi, Anne. Why do you think we aren't hearing more about the back-story of the U.S. Attorney firings scandal? The firings were one thing. But the story behind the firings -- what led to them -- is key to understanding the current "vote fraud" scam being played by the Republicans and the media outlets that are going along with the scam. Isn't it?

Anne E. Kornblut: Great point. I have little to add. Thank you.

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Virginia: You missed one thing about the Dole-Hagan race that is key. It's not just that Dole has been absent from North Carolina, it's that Democrats (including the Senatorial Campaign Committee) have painted her as ineffective. When a senator is away from the state but is working hard and getting the job done, it is a lot easier to forgive. Dole's record is barren, and the "ranked 92nd in effectiveness" line has been a goldmine for the Democrats.

It's a very different strategy than you are seeing from people like Franken and Merkley, where it is all about moving to the Democrats' way of doing things. Hagan's message is about getting work done, not necessarily advocating big Democratic talking points. Based on how things are going, it's working incredibly well.

Anne E. Kornblut: A good point, and thanks so much for your take on it. I know that when I saw the headline about Dole's being in North Carolina only 13 days per year as a senator, it struck me as very, very bad for her.

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Do you think the debate tonight will have more viewers then the previous debate(s)? : No -- Phillies and Dodgers play tonight, viewership will be down, down, down, like the Dodgers ... go Phillies!

Anne E. Kornblut: Thank you!

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To Merle, N.Y.: An easier answer is that the "hit-him-with-Wright" guilt-by-association tactic was already tried (and failed) by Hillary Clinton. Also, McCain's latest attempts at guilt-by-association (using Ayers) have not given him any traction in the polls. I think it only works with the right-wing base. Thinking people apparently are seeing it for what it is: desperation.

Anne E. Kornblut: And another good point...

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Bronx, N.Y.: If McCain had picked Romney, it would be a close race now, right?

Anne E. Kornblut: Who can say? If I were Romney, I would be wondering that myself.

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West Coast: In reference to an earlier post, I thought Reagan changed the atmosphere of Washington. I was a new federal worker when he was elected and immediately saw a change -- all those ridiculous, annoying and ineffective "money-saving" tactics (hot water in the restrooms, nonfunctioning escalators, etc.) were gone overnight. That's probably not what the poster meant by a change in atmosphere, but it reminds me of the uplifted, optimistic feeling brought about by Reagan.

Anne E. Kornblut: What a wonderful level of detail. I was 7 years old when Reagan was elected, but I remember that suddenly all the neighbors around us were moving -- that's what happens around here when one administration ends and another moves in.

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Reston, Va.: Anne, Bill Kristol wrote in a recent editorial that McCain should fire his campaign staff, essentially starting over as the Straight Talk candidate he originally was. While I agree with him when he says that the McCain campaign is dysfunctional, don't you think that it is too late for something that drastic? Even if it could be effective, it could be portrayed as an act of desperation.

Anne E. Kornblut: That's probably true -- but then again, if you're down 10 points, what's to lose?

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Washington: Do you remember who was leading in the last two elections this close to Election Day? What were the results of that? Do you think the same may happen this time around?

Anne E. Kornblut: Well, Bill Clinton was ahead by large margins in both 1992 and 1996, and those margins shrank, but he still won. My memory of 2000 and 2004 is that it was very close, but Bush was pretty much always a smidge ahead.

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Sarah Palin: Is there any chance she will get (or appoint herself to) Sen. Stevens seat? That could be a good position for a pre-2012 run.

Anne E. Kornblut: I've heard talk of this; she hasn't answered the question when asked, though, saying she is focused on Nov. 4.

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Salinas, Calif.: Anne, it seems that John McCain has an impossible task going into tonight's debate in deciding which direction to go. With his poll numbers tanking, does he try to sell his economic plan du jour, or does he go negative and drag William Ayers into the hall one more time? A little of both? At this late date, can you see anything that McCain can do in his last national forum to reverse the momentum toward Obama?

Anne E. Kornblut: It's definitely tough. You are probably right that the answer is a little of both -- that's what he's been doing for the past few days. Stay tuned...

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Seward, Neb.: Hasn't McCain let himself walk into a rather cleverly set Obama trap? First, McCain and his surrogates slime Obama in ads and rallies regarding his association with Ayers. Then Obama says, in effect, "are you man enough to say it to my face?" Now McCain has to bring it up to his face in the debate, giving Obama ample opportunity to prepare a reply, including the opportunity to bring out some of McCain's rather dubious associations.

Anne E. Kornblut: I hadn't thought of it that way, but that's a really good point. We'll know in a few hours!

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Fairfax, Va.: Given the number of races the GOP has to defend in the Senate, is there a priority list of who gets money from the Republican National Committee? For example, are more conservative members like Roger Wicker, Mitch McConnell and Elizabeth Dole higher on the list than, say, relative moderates Gordon Smith and Norm Coleman?

Anne E. Kornblut: I'm focused pretty intently on the presidential race, but the way it generally works is that they put their money into the races that they have the best chances of winning, rather than long-shots. The more money they have to throw around, the more chances they can take. I've never really seen it decided by ideology.

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Los Angeles: The "conservative" circular firing squad continues apace with Christopher Buckley -- son of William F. -- getting tossed from the "National Review" for daring to support Barack Obama. This proud liberal finds it shadenfreude-a-licious. What does the "mainstream media" think?

washingtonpost.com: National Review Boots Buckley Son For Obama Boost (Post, Oct. 15)

Anne E. Kornblut: We are lucky enough here not to have the support-x-candidate-or-you'll-be-fired rule -- it's obviously quite the opposite, because we are, by definition, neutral (and I will not vote in the election because I am covering it). You have to wonder what will happen when this is done -- will they all kiss and make up, or will there be a permanent rupture that leads to new publications and so on?

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New York: The blogs say that inside the Obama campaign they expect white male voters to start creeping back to McCain in the next few weeks, making the race tighter and tipping some states back, but still resulting in an Obama victory. What say you?

Anne E. Kornblut: It would be very unsurprising if the race tightened -- and I know the Obama campaign believes it's closer than the public polling says. Is it about race, or something else? Hard to say.

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Krugman: Paul Krugman earned his Nobel Prize for his work on economic theory and modeling (where he is the Leonardo da Vinci). His columns and his political views have nothing to do with t. He has been expected to win since around 1991. They just usually don't like giving the prize to someone so young (even now at 55).

Anne E. Kornblut: Thank you for that -- and you are correct about what he won for. My earlier post was a comment on how the White House may feel about that -- what their interpretation of it may be.

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Arlington, Va.: The DSCC has just gone into Georgia in the Jim Martin-Saxby Chambliss race. This one has polled within a few points in the past couple weeks, and could be winnable for the Democrats. Do they have a shot?

Anne E. Kornblut: Good question; I will post the question here and let all ruminate on it, because we are, sadly, at the end of our hour.

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Anne E. Kornblut: Thank you everyone! See you soon, and keep writing in. It's going to be such a terrific few weeks to watch.

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