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Fort Hood copes with pain and loss

As investigations into the the Nov. 5 massacre at the Fort Hood, Tex. army base ensue, the military community deals with the realities of violence at home and abroad.

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Through hours of wrenching testimony, Ft. Hood psychiatrist Nidal Malik Hasan shows no emotion
Article | FORT HOOD, TEX. - Army Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan sits in a wheelchair every day and listens while, one by one, the wounded and traumatized offer their accounts of 10 minutes of terror. Some bow their heads and weep. Some glower.
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Fort Hood marks massacre anniversary
Article | Until Friday, there was only one outward symbol at Fort Hood of the chaos and carnage that erupted there on Nov. 5, 2009. The wreaths of ribbons and flowers hung on a fence surrounding Building 42003 at the massive Army post in Texas. They were placed there by a wife who became a widow that day.
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Members of Hasan's mosque speak about Fort Hood shooting
Video | Members and leaders of the Muslim Community Center in Silver Spring, where Maj. Nidal M. Hasan used to pray, speak out the day after the tragedy. They describe him as a devout Muslim, quiet but friendly.
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'I could hear the bullets going past me'
Article | The first frantic 911 calls had come just four minutes earlier. Kimberly Munley, a civilian police officer for the Army, rounded the corner of a squat, one-story building at 1:27 p.m. Thursday and came face to face with Army Maj. Nidal M. Hasan.

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