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Civil War 150

Special coverage of the 150th anniversary of the American Civil War

Washington, D.C.: 1860 and today

The city that awaited Abraham Lincoln in fall 1860 was a far cry from the populous, gleaming capital it would become after -- and largely because of -- the Civil War.

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Out of Virginia's attics, voices from the past
Article | Salvaged from dusty basements and attics, scrawled on timeworn paper that has been folded and refolded, the long-silent voices emerge:
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A less-than-monumental city
Article | On the cool autumn Tuesday that Abraham Lincoln would be elected president, the Washington Evening Star reprinted on its front page a dispatch from a British reporter covering a recent visit by the prince of Wales, the future King Edward VII.
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Where they were then
Article | The military architect of the Union's triumph In 1860, he was a 38-year-old West Point graduate and veteran of the Mexican War, but he had resigned from the Army six years before, lonely, depressed and alcoholic. A failed farmer who had once built a house called Hardscrabble, he had lately sold...
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Press reaction to Lincoln's win
Article | Thursday, Nov. 8, 1860 WHOOP-EE President, ABRAHAM LINCOLN

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