Seung Hui Cho -- The Struggle to Understand a Killer
THE VIRGINIA TECH SHOOTER
Seung Hui Cho never received the treatment ordered by a judge who declared him dangerously mentally ill less than two years before his rampage at Virginia Tech, law enforcement officials said, exposing flaws in Virginia's labyrinthine mental health system, including confusion about the law, spotty...
 
THE VIRGINIA TECH SHOOTER
Hyang In Cho was so desperate to find help for her silent, angry son that she sought out some members of One Mind Church in Woodbridge to heal him of what the church's head pastor called "demonic power."
 
BLACKSBURG, Va., April 25 -- Seung Hui Cho stood outside as his first victim walked into the Virginia Tech dormitory early on the morning of the April 16 massacre. Witnesses told police that Cho -- wearing the same dark clothing he wore later when he continued his rampage at an academic building --...
 
THE GUNMAN
An initial autopsy of the Virginia Tech gunman found no brain function abnormalities that could explain the rampage that left 32 people dead at the Blacksburg university, a state medical examiner said yesterday.
 
The 'Amok' Phenomenon
For more than two centuries, explorers, travelers and researchers have tracked the disturbing phenomenon of individuals who act out their rage against the world in an abrupt burst of homicide against total strangers.
 
VIRGINIA TECH KILLER'S EARLY YEARS
Warning signs about Seung Hui Cho came early in his life.
 
BLACKSBURG, Va., April 17 -- They met across the professor's desk. One on one. The chairman of the English department and the silent, brooding student who never took his sunglasses off.
 
WORDS OF A KILLER
For a look into the mind of a mass murderer, consider reading "Richard McBeef," a 10-page play written by Cho Seung Hui.
 
All the cheap rage, all the macho posturing of a demented boy is condensed in that image. A young man holds out his arms, at eye level, each hand covered in a dark glove, each holding a gun. He wears a vest that looks vaguely military, and his eyes are set in a steely rage. A black cap, turned...
 
Images
All the cheap rage, all the macho posturing of a demented boy is condensed in that image. A young man holds out his arms at eye level, each hand covered in a dark glove, each holding a gun. He wears a vest that looks vaguely military, and his eyes are steely. A black cap, turned backward, covers ...
 
Much has been made of the frightening similarity between "Oldboy," Park Chan Wook's dark 2003 movie thriller, and the deeds of Cho Seung Hui, who shot to death 32 people on Monday at Virginia Tech.
 
Cho Seung Hui paused Monday morning during the shootings at Virginia Tech to stop at a post office and mail to NBC News in New York a disturbing package of pictures, writings and video before returning to the rampage.
 
In the middle of the day yesterday, the media swarm moved -- for a few hours --from Blacksburg to Centreville as news emerged that the Virginia Tech shooter, Cho Seung Hui, had grown up in the Sully Station II neighborhood. There was something in the chilly winds that seemed unsettling.
 
COMMON PISTOLS
On Feb. 9, Cho Seung Hui walked into a pawnshop on Main Street in Blacksburg, directly across the street from the Virginia Tech campus, and picked up one of the guns he would use in his deadly rampage Monday: a Walther .22-caliber pistol, a relatively inexpensive firearm most commonly used for ta...
 

© 2007 Washingtonpost.Newsweek Interactive