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D.C. Police to Announce Developments in Missing Woman's Case

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Washington Post Staff Writer
Monday, January 14, 2008; 7:44 PM

D.C. police have obtained an arrest warrant charging a man with murder in the case of Shaquita Bell, a 23-year-old mother of three who disappeared in 1996.

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Authorities provided no details today but have scheduled a news conference for tomorrow morning to identify the suspect and outline what police believe took place.

Bell, a former bakery clerk who lived with her grandmother in Alexandria, was last seen by her family the morning of June 27, 1996. That day, Bell left her grandmother's house with Michael Dickerson, her estranged boyfriend and father of her youngest child. Police have said they believe that Bell was slain in the District. Her remains have never been found. Authorities last year searched for her body in Prince George's County.

Bell disappeared days before she was to appear as a witness against Dickerson, who had been charged with assaulting her. Since then, her mother, Jackie Winborne, has kept constant pressure on police to solve the case.


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