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Literary Calendar

March 31-April 6, 2008

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Sunday, March 30, 2008; Page BW13

31 MONDAY

12:30 P.M. Michael K. Honey, a professor of African American and labor studies and American history, discusses his book Going Down Jericho Road: The Memphis Strike, Martin Luther King's Last Campaign at a brownbag lunch (refreshments provided) at the AFL-CIO, Gompers Room, 815 16th St. NW. A book signing follows; for details, call 202-637-5034.

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7 P.M. Travel writer and consultant Marybeth Bond discusses and signs her new guidebook, Best Girlfriends Getaways Worldwide, at the Sixth & I Historic Synagogue, 600 I St. NW. Tickets are $6, or two free with purchase of the book, available 30 minutes prior to the event. For details, visit http://www.sixthandi.org.

7 P.M. Elizabeth Crane, author of the short story collection You Must Be This Happy to Enter, joins Paul Fattaruso, author of the new homage, Bicycle, for a reading at Olsson's Books-Dupont, 1307 19th St. NW, 202-737-1133.

7:30 P.M. Annie Griffiths Belt, one of National Geographic's first female photographers, discusses her new illustrated memoir, A Camera, Two Kids, and a Camel: My Journey in Photographs, as part of the "National Geographic Live!" series held at the National Geographic Society, Grosvenor Auditorium, 1600 M St. NW. Admission is $18 for nonmembers; call 202-857-7700 or visit http://www.nglive.org to RSVP.

1 TUESDAY

12:30 P.M. Sidney Blumenthal, a former advisor in the Clinton White House, discusses and signs The Strange Death of Republican America: Chronicles of a Collapsing Party at Barnes & Noble-Metro Center, 555 12th St. NW, 202-347-4170.

4 P.M. Newton N. Minow, former chairman of the FCC, and journalism professor Craig L. LaMay discuss their new book, Inside the Presidential Debates: Their Improbable Past and Promising Future, with commentary from historian Michael Beschloss and journalist Elisabeth Bumiller, at the Woodrow Wilson Center, 6th floor auditorium, 1300 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. A reception and book signing follow; call 202-691-4147 to RSVP.

4:30 P.M. Professor Paul S. Herrnson, director of the Center for American Politics and Citizenship at the University of Maryland, discusses Voting Technology: The Not-So-Simple Act of Casting a Ballot (Herrnson is a co-author) as part of the series "Speaking of Books ... Conversations with Campus Authors" at the University of Maryland, McKeldin Library, Room 6137, College Park, Md. Contact Lily Griner at griner@umd.edu for details.

7 P.M. Iranian-born writer and artist Marjane Satrapi, author of Persepolis (her memoir of Iran's Islamic Revolution told in graphic novel form and the basis for an Oscar-nominated animated film), delivers the 2008 Baldwin Lecture in Humanities at the College of Notre Dame of Maryland, 4701 N. Charles St., Baltimore, Md. A book signing follows. For details, call 410-532-5516 or visit http://www.ndm.edu. She will also speak on Wednesday, April 2, at 7 p.m. at the McLean Community Center, Alden Theatre, 1234 Ingleside Ave., McLean, Va. Admission to this event, sponsored by the Fairfax County Public Library (part of its "Perspectives" series), is free. Tickets will be distributed (limit four per person) beginning at 7 p.m.; call 703-324-8428 for details.

7 P.M. David Rothkopf discusses and signs Superclass: The Global Power Elite and the World They Are Making at Politics and Prose Bookstore, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW, 202-364-1919.

7 P.M. Law professor Michael I. Meyerson discusses and signs Liberty's Blueprint: How Madison and Hamilton Wrote The Federalist, Defined the Constitution, and Made Democracy Safe for the World at Olsson's Books-Penn Quarter, 418 Seventh St. NW, 202-638-7610. He will also speak on Wednesday, April 2, at 5:30 p.m. at the University of Baltimore School of Law, 1415 Maryland Ave., Baltimore, Md. A reception and book signing follow. Visit http://www.law.ubalt.edu or e-mail lawevents@ubalt.edu for details.

7:30 P.M. Nick Taylor reads from and signs The Disagreement, his Civil War novel, at Borders Books-Baileys Crossroads, Route 7 at Columbia Pike, Baileys Crossroads, Va., 703-998-0404.

2 WEDNESDAY

Noon. The National Gallery of Art and the Embassy of Italy host a celebration marking the publication of The Italian Legacy in Washington D.C.: Architecture, Design, Art, and Culture (edited by Luca Molinari and Andrea Canepari with photographs by Max Mackenzie) in the East Building auditorium, Fourth St. & Constitution Ave. NW. Introductory remarks by Giovanni Castellaneta, the Italian ambassador to the United States, will be followed by an illustrated lecture by Italian architect Massimiliano Fuksas, a panel discussion with gallery curator David Alan Brown and chief archivist Maygene Daniels and a book signing. For details, visit http://www.nga.gov/programs/lectures.

7:30 P.M. Michael Farquhar discusses and signs his new compendium, A Treasury of Foolishly Forgotten Americans: Pirates, Skinflints, Patriots, and Other Colorful Characters Stuck in the Footnotes of History, at Borders Books-Baileys Crossroads, 703-998-0404.

3 THURSDAY

10:30 A.M. Children's author John Flanagan reads from and discusses Ranger's Apprentice: Book Four: The Battle for Skandia, his new fantasy novel, at Politics and Prose Bookstore, 202-364-1919.

6:30 P.M. Former White House press secretary Dee Dee Myers discusses and signs her new book, Why Women Should Rule the World, at Borders Books-Downtown, 18th & L Sts. NW, 202-466-4999.

7 P.M. Daoud Hari discusses and signs The Translator: A Tribesman's Memoir of Darfur at Politics and Prose Bookstore (202-364-1919) in a program co-sponsored by the Save Darfur Coalition ( http://savedarfur.org).

7:30 P.M. Doug Fine, a correspondent for NPR, discusses Farewell, My Subaru: An Epic Adventure in Local Living, his effort to live a year without consuming fossil fuels, as part of the series "National Geographic Live!" at the National Geographic Society, Grosvenor Auditorium. Admission is $18 for nonmembers; call 202-857-7700 or visit http://www.nglive.org to RSVP.

4 FRIDAY

7:30 P.M. Novelist Barbara Esstman, author of Night Ride Ho me and The Other Anna, presents a lecture, "The Long Haul Between First Idea and Finished Book: How to Keep Going Through the Unfortunate Middle," as part of the Northern Virginia Writers' "First Friday" series held at the Leesburg Town Hall, 25 W. Market St., Leesburg, Va. Admission is $4 for Writer's Center members and Leesburg residents, $6 for the general public. Call 301-654-8664 or visit http://www.writer.org for details.

7:30 P.M. Novelist Susan Coll, author of Rockville Pike: A Suburban Comedy of Manners and Acceptance, reads from her work as part of the new literary/musical series HearArts, at VisArts, Rockville Town Center, 155 Gibbs St., Rockville, Md. Music will be provided by the Bethesda Chamber Singers, an a cappella group boasting a wide repertoire. The program closes with an open mic segment. The series is held every first Friday of the month; for details, visit http://www.visartscenter.org.

8 P.M. PEN/Faulkner winds up its 2007-08 season with a reading by "The Three Kings": bestselling novelist Stephen King, his wife, Tabitha King, and their son Owen King at the Folger Shakespeare Library, 201 East Capitol St. SE. A reception and book signing follow. Tickets are $30; RSVP at 202-544-7077 or http://www.folger.edu/pen.

5 SATURDAY

2 P.M. The National Museum of the American Indian will hold a panel discussion with contributors to the new reference book Do All Indians Live in Tipis?: Questions and Answers from the National Museum of the American Indian in the Rasmuson Theater. A book signing follows. The museum is located at Fourth St. & Independence Ave. SW; for details, visit http://www.americanindian.si.edu.

4 P.M. Journalist Philip Shenon discusses and signs The Commission: The Uncensored History of the 9/11 Investigation at Books & Crannies, 19 E. Washington St., Middleburg, Va., 540-687-6677.

5 P.M. Melina Mara, a staff photographer at The Washington Post, will discuss her recent book, Changing the Face of Power: Women in the U.S. Senate, at the Cultural Arts Center, 15 W. Patrick St., Frederick, Md. The book is the basis for an exhibition now on view at the arts center. A reception and book signing follow. This event is part of the Frederick Arts Council's First Saturday Gallery Walk in the historic downtown, the theme of which is "Much Ado About Books." For further details, visit http://www.frederickartscouncil.org.

6 SUNDAY

1 P.M. Jonathan Rieder discusses and signs The Word of the Lord Is Upon Me: The Righteous Performance of Martin Luther King, Jr. at Politics and Prose Bookstore, 202-364-1919.


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