» This Story:Read +| Comments

Grown-up granola bars

Lisa's Oat, Nut, Fruit and Seed Bars
Lisa's Oat, Nut, Fruit and Seed Bars (Katherine Frey/The Washington Post)

Network News

X Profile
View More Activity
Discussion Policy
Comments that include profanity or personal attacks or other inappropriate comments or material will be removed from the site. Additionally, entries that are unsigned or contain "signatures" by someone other than the actual author will be removed. Finally, we will take steps to block users who violate any of our posting standards, terms of use or privacy policies or any other policies governing this site. Please review the full rules governing commentaries and discussions. You are fully responsible for the content that you post.
Wednesday, May 19, 2010

It's time for granola bars to grow up.

This Story

In the 1960s they were well-meaning, with a texture painfully reminiscent of drywall. Over time they grew into an uneven genre of wrapped bars that contained rolled oats but not necessarily nuts or dried fruit.

In my continuing quest to redefine classic baked goods, I spent more than three years testing my way through dry, anemic specimens and moist, doughy bars; the latter style produced one of the worst attempts ever.

The result is a bar that is rugged, not boring and decidedly un-retro. The recipe represents lavish manipulation on my part: There is sweetness and moistness, with plenty of oats, fruit, coconut and nuts folded into a mantle of syrup with notes of caramel and vanilla.

Mine are not "lite" bars. But they are delicious, and light-years ahead of their predecessors.

Recipe

Lisa's Oat, Nut, Fruit and Seed Bars

-- Lisa Yockelson, author of "ChocolateChocolate" (Wiley, 2005) and of "Baking Style," a book on the art and craft of baking at home, to be published by Wiley next year.



» This Story:Read +| Comments
© 2010 The Washington Post Company

Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity