Connecting Classrooms Worldwide
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Connecting Classrooms Worldwide

To Robbie Daitzman and Joanne Guidry, students at the Loudoun Academy of Science, the classroom extends far beyond their Sterling, Va., school. The pair have spent the year working with two peers in Singapore on projects to determine the benefits of maggot flatulence. The collaboration is one example of the ways U.S. students are working with peers in another country. Video by Maria Glod, Edited by Ashley Barnas/The Washington Post

© 2009