Struggling Auto Industry's Trickle-Down Effect
{ "movie":"http://media10.washingtonpost.com/wp/swf/OmniPlayer.swf", "id":"oplayer-video-swf", "width":"100%", height:"100%", "vars":{ "title":"Struggling Auto Industry\'s Trickle-Down Effect", "stillURL":"http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/photo/2009/07/10/PH2009071002740.jpg", "mediaQueryString":"http://static.washingtonpost.com/wp/swf/OmniPlayer.swf?id=07102009-7v&flvURL=/media/2009/07/10/07102009-7v&playAds=true&adZone=wpni.video.bc&canShare=false" }, "params":{ "allowFullScreen":"true" } }

Struggling Auto Industry's Trickle-Down Effect

At his shop in Jackson, Mich., Billy Miller makes rotors, hubs and drums that are sold to the Big Three American auto companies. But since the auto industry's downfall, he's struggling to keep alive the business his father started in 1942. Video by Dana Hedgpeth/The Washington PostEditor: Jonathan Forsythe/The Washington Post

© 2009