New Technique Helps Scientists Create Reef
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New Technique Helps Scientists Create Reef

Video from an underwater unmanned vehicle shows both the barren bottom of a Chesapeake Bay tributary, and then a large, thriving reef in Virginia's Great Wicomico River. Scientists say that a new technique has allowed them to create the reef, where the "smoke rings" blown out by oysters are a sign that they are filtering algae and dirt from the water. Video by Courtesy Science Magazine

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